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I'm studying asymptotic notations from the book and I can't understand what the author means. I know that if f(n) = Θ(n^2) then f(n) = O(n^2). However, I understand from the author's words that for insertion sort function algorithm f(n) = Θ(n) and f(n)=O(n^2).

Why? Does the big omega or big theta change with different inputs?

He says that:

"The Θ(n^2) bound on the worst-case running time of insertion sort, however, does not imply a Θ(n^2) bound on the running time of insertion sort on every input. "

However it is different for big-oh notation. What does he mean? What is the difference between them?

I'm so confused. I'm copy pasting it below:

Since O-notation describes an upper bound, when we use it to bound the worst-case running time of an algorithm, we have a bound on the running time of the algorithm on every input. Thus, the O(n^2) bound on worst-case running time of insertion sort also applies to its running time on every input. The Θ(n^2) bound on the worst-case running time of insertion sort, however, does not imply a Θ(n^2) bound on the running time of insertion sort on every input. For example, when the input is already sorted, insertion sort runs in Θ(n) time.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does the big omega or big theta change with different inputs?

Yes. To give a simpler example, consider linear search in an array from left to right. In the worst and average case, this algorithm takes f(n) = a × n/2 + b expected steps for some constants a and b. But when the left element is guaranteed to always hold the key you're looking for, it always takes a + b steps.

Since Θ denotes a strict bound, and Θ(n) != Θ(n²), it follows that the Θ for the two kinds of input is different.

EDIT: as for Θ and big-O being different on the same input, yes, that's perfectly possible. Consider the following (admittedly trivial) example.

When we set n to 5, then n = 5 and n < 6 are both true. But when we set n to 1, then n = 5 is false while n < 6 is still true.

Similarly, big-O is just an upper bound, just like < on numbers, while Θ is a strict bound like =.

(Actually, Θ is more like a < n < b for constants a and b, i.e. it defines something analogous to a range of numbers, but the principle is the same.)

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For a same function and same input , is it possible that the big-oh and big-theta is different? –  oiyio Oct 10 '12 at 9:36
    
@user1308990: yes. See updated answer. –  larsmans Oct 10 '12 at 9:44
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To elaborate, Theta(f(n)) is actually the intersection of O(f(n)) and Omega(f(n)). Everything that is Theta(f(n)) is also O(f(n)) - but not the other way around. –  amit Oct 10 '12 at 10:07
    
in the link which David gave , a man says that : " Basically when we say an algorithm is of O(n), it's also O(n^2), O(n^1000000), O(2^n), ... but a Θ(n) algorithm is not Θ(n^2). " can this sentence be the exact answer of my question ? "O(n^2) applies to every answer" author says. Even if the best case is f(n)=O(1) , we can say f(n)=O(n^2) because worst case is O(n^2). However , since theta(n) is not theta(n^2) , we cannot say the same thing for theta unlike in big-og notation. Am i right? –  oiyio Oct 10 '12 at 16:08
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@user1308990: no. Θ vs. O is completely unrelated to best case vs. expected vs. worst case. You can say f(n) = O(1) even when f(n) = O(n²) just because n² > 1 for every n greater than some constant. –  larsmans Oct 10 '12 at 17:33

we have a bound on the running time of the algorithm on every input

It means that if there is a set of inputs with running time n^2 while other have less, then the algorithm is O(n^2).

The Θ(n^2) bound on the worst-case running time of insertion sort, however, does not imply a Θ(n^2) bound on the running time of insertion sort on every input

He is saying that the converse is not true. If an algorithm is O(n^2), it doesnt not mean every single input will run with quadratic time.

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Big-O is not the same as "worst case" as you are implying. If there is a set of inputs with running time n^2 while others have less, then the algorithm takes O(n^2) and Theta(n^2) in the worst case. Just saying "the algorithm is O(n^2)" is meaningless. –  interjay Oct 10 '12 at 9:53
    
not Theta(n^2) in worse case if others have less... –  UmNyobe Oct 10 '12 at 11:38
    
It is Theta(n^2) in the worst case. If you are looking at the worst case than the other cases aren't a factor. Even the part quoted from the book by the OP gives an example of exactly such a case. –  interjay Oct 10 '12 at 12:48
    
"Theta(n^2) in the worst case" implies the complexity for any input in worst case is quadratic, no less and no more. –  UmNyobe Oct 10 '12 at 12:52
    
remember, in my word i never talked about worst case or average case or best case, i talked about running time. So I am not mixing Big-O and worse case. –  UmNyobe Oct 10 '12 at 12:54

My academic theory on the insertion sort algorithm is far away in the past, but from what I understand in your copy-paste :

big-O notation always describe the worst case, but big-Theta describe some sort of average for typical data.

take a look at this : What is the difference between Θ(n) and O(n)?

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Nope, that's not what Θ and big-O mean. Θ is a strict bound, O an upper bound. Both can be applied to average, worst-case, best-case or amortized analysis. –  larsmans Oct 10 '12 at 9:30

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