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When working with gwt on client side there is common situation to call asynchronous method with processing in callback method.

asyncService.method(new AbstractAsyncCallback<Number>() {
  @Override
  public void onSuccess(Number num) {
    // do something with number
  }
});

But often encountered situation where need to get result from one asynchronous method, pass to another, etc. That's why we get dirty cascade code, that hard to read.

asyncService.method(new AbstractAsyncCallback<Number>() {
      @Override
      public void onSuccess(Number num) {
        asyncService.method1(num, new AbstractAsyncCallback<String>() {
          @Override
          public void onSuccess(String str) {
             asyncService.method2(str, new AbstractAsyncCallback<Void>() {
               @Override
               public void onSuccess(Void void) {
                 // do something
               }
             });
          }
        });
      }
    });

I know, we can combine this three calls on server side to make separate service method, but what if we need a lot such combinations of different methods? Another concern is to add separate method, that perform functionality that we can get by simple combination of existing ones.

Is there a common pattern to get rid of such code and not change server-side service?

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IMHO, your question should also include the onFailure methods –  Jean-Michel Garcia Oct 10 '12 at 12:19
1  
@Jean-MichelGarcia onFailure ommited for sake of simplicity. BTW, AbstractAsyncCallback have default implementaton for it. –  mishadoff Oct 10 '12 at 12:30

3 Answers 3

You outlined one pattern: a chain of calls. This pattern should be used only if the second call depends on the results of the first call, etc.

If you can execute requests in parallel, you should. One option is a target method that waits for other methods to complete before proceeding. In this example showPerson() will be called twice, but it will execute only once when all data is ready.

Integer age = null;
String name = null;

asyncService.method(new AbstractAsyncCallback<Integer>() {
    @Override
    public void onSuccess(Integer num) {
        age = num;
        showPerson();
    }
});
asyncService.method(new AbstractAsyncCallback<String>() {
    @Override
    public void onSuccess(String n) {
        name = n;
        showPerson();
    }
});

private void showPerson() {
    if (name != null && age != null) {
        myView.showPerson(name, age);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
good option, helps to get linear code instead of cascade. –  mishadoff Oct 10 '12 at 12:39
    
Creating new callbacks each time could cause memory leaks in IE see this: groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/google-web-toolkit/f9FLCEloW-c/… –  user1711180 Oct 13 '12 at 8:33
    
@user1711180 The question was about the pattern of asynchronous calls. You can obviously create static callbacks if necessary. –  Andrei Volgin Oct 13 '12 at 12:59

Instead of using anonymous classes, you could create named classes. That would eliminate the confusing nesting and, if you use meaningful names, maybe make your code easier to understand.

share|improve this answer
    
@Eduardo if we create named functions we get small improvement in readability, but we create a lot one-usage names, that fill our namespaces, actually without any reason. Also we need create such nested functions in a backward manner: from the most inner to the top one, which not follows a call logic –  mishadoff Oct 10 '12 at 12:36
    
@mishadoff: I understand. I suffer the same type of pain when I program in ActionScript. It clears up the clutter a bit, but creates other issues. –  Eduardo Oct 10 '12 at 12:49

We usually prefer to define variables with the anonymous callback implementation, those variables are at the same level in the code, so as they are more readable, and we tend to sort them to understand the workflow. Another goal is that those callbacks can be reusable.

  AsyncService asyncService = GWT.create(AsyncService.class);

  AsyncCallback<Number> onMethod1Response = new AbstractAsyncCallback<Number>() {
    public void onSuccess(Number num) {
      asyncService.method2(onMethod2Response);
    }
  };

  AsyncCallback<String> onMethod2Response = new AbstractAsyncCallback<String>() {
    public void onSuccess(String str) {
      // do something
    }
  };  

  asyncService.method1(onMethod1Response);
share|improve this answer
    
Good point, new callbacks cause memory leaks in IE, so having just an instance of them and reusing them could avoid problems in old browsers. My +1 for this. –  user1711180 Oct 13 '12 at 8:29

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