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The question is, what would be the best or maybe a better practice to use. Suppose I have a function, which belongs to some class and this function needs to use some static variable. There are two possible approaches - to declare this variable as class's member:

class SomeClass
{
public:
    ....
    void someMethod();
private:
    static int m_someVar;
};

SomeClass::someMethod()
{
    // Do some things here
    ....
    ++m_someVar;
}

Or to declare it inside the function.

class SomeClass
{
public:
    ....
    void someMethod();
};

SomeClass::someMethod()
{
    static int var = 0;
    ++m_someVar;
    // Do some things here
    ....
}

I can see some advantages for the second variant. It provides a better encapsulation and better isolates details of an implementation. So it would be easier to use this function in some other class probably. And if this variable should be modified only by a single function, then it can prevent some erroneous data corruption from other methods.

While it's quite obvious, that the first variant is the only one to use when you need to share a static variable among several methods (class functions), the question pertains the case when a static variable should be used only for a single function. Are there any advantages for the first variant in that case? I can think only about some multi threading related stuff...

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I like the second approach (you can use that for sharing too: stackoverflow.com/questions/12778581/…), both have the same issues with multi-threading, the second doesn't suffer from order of initialization issues with multiple translation units. –  Nim Oct 10 '12 at 10:23
    
Personally I usually put such variables into an anonymous namespace in the implementation file. –  Seg Fault Oct 10 '12 at 10:23
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's simple - use a static member if, logically, it belongs to the class (sort of like instanceCounter) and use a static local if it logically belongs to a function (numberOfTimesThisMethodWasCalled).

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just curios, is there any way to access numberOfTimesThisMethodWasCalled without calling the method because I don't know any? –  Marius Oct 10 '12 at 10:29
    
@MariusBucur no. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 10 '12 at 10:33
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The choice of static or not depends completely on the context. If a particular variable needs to be common among all the instances of a class, you make it static.

However, if a variable needs to be visible only in a function and needs to be common across every call of the function, just make it a local static variable.

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1  
A "local variable" usually refers to something on the stack, definitely not what is desired here. –  Seg Fault Oct 10 '12 at 10:26
    
I hope the edit is okay...i meant a local static... –  sleekFish Oct 10 '12 at 10:31
    
Yes, now it's clear. –  Seg Fault Oct 10 '12 at 10:32
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The difference between static data members and static variable in a function is that first are initialized at start-up and the second first time the function is called (lazy initialization).

Lazy initialization can create problem when a function is used in a muti-threaded application, if it is not required by the design I prefer to use static members.

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1  
Actually, I think statics are thread-safe come C++11. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 10 '12 at 10:34
    
Would be interesting to know, what exactly problems can cause a lazy initialization for a multi thread app? If a function with a local static var, which wasn't initialized in the current thread, gets called in another thread, doesn't it mean that it would be initialized from that call? –  Occulta Oct 10 '12 at 10:42
    
@Occulta the problem would come if both threads tried to initialize the object at the same time. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 10 '12 at 10:54
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