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I am currently porting some native code to C#, which consists of various structures, delegates, enumerations and external method calls.

Some of the fields within structures expect certain constants to be applied to them. It seems logical to list the constants within the structure, rather than in a separate location, as this should keep everything organized, but I am unsure what effect this would have on the structure during marshaling / interoperability with native calls.

Say for example my structure was defined as such:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct NATIVE_STRUCTURE
{
     public int Value;
}

Value in this instance might require one of the following constants

VALUE1 = 0x0001;
VALUE2 = 0x0002;

So is it safe for me to write these structures like so:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct NATIVE_STRUCTURE
{
     public int Value;

     public const int VALUE1 = 0x0001;
     public const int VALUE2 = 0x0002;
}

Can anyone shed some light onto how this might affect the code at runtime (if at all). Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's better to use enums. Something like this:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct NATIVE_STRUCTURE
{
    public NativeFoo FooValue;
}

public enum NativeFoo
{
   VALUE1 = 0x0001,
   VALUE2 = 0x0002,
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I thought about doing it this way. Unfortunately this is going to add a hell of a lot of enumerations as there are about 2000 structures, and any one of them may require multiple enumerations. However +1 for effort, thanks! –  series0ne Oct 10 '12 at 10:52
3  
@activwerx With that many structs, you might benefit from figuring out how to make SWIG do it for you. I personally haven't used it though. –  romkyns Oct 10 '12 at 10:54
    
VALUE1 and VALUE2 both have value 0x1. –  Henrik Oct 10 '12 at 11:04
1  
@Henrik fixed - although I encourage you to just edit yourself whenever you spot an obvious error like that. –  romkyns Oct 10 '12 at 13:05
1  
@FelixK, OK I may have to use your approach and find a naming convention for the enums that makes sense. –  series0ne Oct 10 '12 at 13:53

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