Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm relatively new to coding; most of my "work" has been just simple GUI apps that only function for one thing, so I haven't had to thread much.

Anyway, one thing I'm wondering about threading is if you want to keep a thread alive forever to do whatever job it's doing (processing, waiting for input, whatever), is it normal to format it like so:

while (true) {
    // do stuff
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
}

(or something along those lines)...? Or is this not safe and should it be avoided if possible?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Yep, that's what you do.

But typically it's like:

bool keepRunning = true;

...

while(keepRunning){
}

Because sometimes you may like to have someone/something else to have the ability to stop you.

share|improve this answer
    
So it is common practice? Okay. What are the problems with say, Thread.Abort() if you wanted to close that? Just curious. –  Corey Aug 15 '09 at 12:03
8  
Thread.Abort is fine but it'll cause an exception, and it may interrupt something that you care about finishing. With the 'keepRunning' variable it lets you finish whatever you were doing gracefully (though it won't result in an immediate finish). –  Noon Silk Aug 15 '09 at 12:09
2  
Abort has its problems since it can cause data structures to remain unstable, and since the thread is releasing them other threads could become unstable too. (supposed they were locked while being handled, therefore unstable when released). That's why the method was made deprecated in Java, at least. –  Aviad Ben Dov Aug 15 '09 at 12:10
3  
Thread.Abort is not fine. Don't ever do that. –  Henk Holterman Aug 15 '09 at 15:14
1  
Also don't forgot to make keepRunning volatile! (volatile bool keepRunning = true;) –  Cris McLaughlin Aug 15 '09 at 20:38
show 4 more comments

Additionally You can use System.Threading.Timer. In this case, we don't have to use the Sleep method. Simple example:

public sealed class TimerTask
{
    private Timer _timer;
    private int _period;

    public TimerTask(int period)
    {
        _period = period;
        _timer = new Timer(new TimerCallback(Run), "Hello ....", Timeout.Infinite, period);
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        _timer.Change(0, _period);
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        _timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite);
    }

    private void Run(Object param)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(param.ToString());
    }
}

Use:

public static class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(String[] args)
    {
        TimerTask task = new TimerTask(1000);
        Console.WriteLine("Timer start.");
        task.Start();
        Console.ReadLine();
        Console.WriteLine("Timer stop.");
        task.Stop();
        Console.ReadLine();
        Console.WriteLine("Timer start.");
        task.Start();
        Console.ReadLine();
        Console.WriteLine("Timer stop.");
        task.Stop();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Console output:

Timer start.
Hello ....
Hello ....
Hello ....

Timer stop.

Timer start.
Hello ....
Hello ....

Timer stop.
share|improve this answer
add comment

Just as some additional info, typical none ending loops use

for(;;)
{
 ...
}

as there is no compare done in the loop. When doing threads it is best to check a flag if the loop to end or not though.

share|improve this answer
1  
Works, but it is an awful C-ism that is unnecessarily cryptic. –  Henk Holterman Aug 15 '09 at 19:11
add comment

Ideally you want the thread to be "runnable" when it has work to do, and "sleeping" when there is nothing to do.

This is best done with objects like mutual exclusions (mutexes), semaphores and condition variables, which provide mechanisms for threads to wake other threads up when there may be something for them to do.

Just doing a timed sleep is inefficient, because a short sleep means the thread wastes time waking up to check if there's work to do, while a long sleep means the thread might be asleep while there's work to be done. Usually this is not a big deal but if the code deals with large volumes of requests or data things don't go so well.

A basic model works like this: Thread A puts objects in a queue. Thread B removes an object from the queue, performs an action, and repeats. If there are no objects in the queue, thread B will remain asleep until an object arrives.

You must also be careful that threads which access shared stuff avoid race conditions.

I can't give any C#-specific insight, but I know that C# gives you some tools to help you out.

share|improve this answer
add comment

To elaborate a bit more, if a thread is sleeping, when the OS comes along to activate the thread, it will just check to see if it's still sleeping and if so, then just yield its timeslice.

If you leave out the Sleep and do something like

while (true)
{
    if (workAvailable)
        {
        doWork();       
        }
}

then even if workAvailable is false it will keep spinning until the OS stops it, taking up its entire slice doing nothing. Obviously that's a little more inefficient.

You can get even more complex as needed with mutexes, semaphores and whatnot, as mentioned above, but things get complex quickly with those, so you might want to use them to solve a particular problem.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.