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I want to replace IP address after second comma to 92.2.11.1 for all:

pr,th-klmndisj,92.2.11.1
da,th-kl532disj,92.2.11.8
fr,th-klmn4532j,92.2.21.2
pr,th-klmn52sj,92.2.11.3

Expected View:

pr,th-klmndisj,92.2.11.1
da,th-kl532disj,92.2.11.1
fr,th-klmn4532j,92.2.11.1
pr,th-klmn52sj,92.2.11.1
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using what language to replace the IP address? –  Ray Eatmon Oct 10 '12 at 11:17
    
do you want to use Regex? –  Ray Eatmon Oct 10 '12 at 11:19
    
Everything which will work on Linux, sorry I forget to put that. –  Kalin Borisov Oct 10 '12 at 11:22
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You probably meant the second comma.

sed 's/^\([^,]*,[^,]*,\).*/\192.2.11.1/'

Explanation: Search for non-commas, a comma, more non-commas, a coma. The part in \(...\) is replaced by itself (\1), the rest of the line is thrown out and the new string is printed.

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It's a second yes,thanks. –  Kalin Borisov Oct 10 '12 at 11:21
    
Thank you for explanation. –  Kalin Borisov Oct 10 '12 at 11:26
    
One thing is when if we have something like that: pr,th-klmn52sj,92.2.11.1,8.8.8.8 command replace after second comma and next also with that single result 92.2.11.1 –  Kalin Borisov Oct 10 '12 at 11:36
    
@KalinBorisov: I do not understand. Please, update your question or post a new one including the example input and output as you did in this case. –  choroba Oct 10 '12 at 11:40
1  
@KalinBorisov: Oh, I see. You want to keep the stuff after the third comma. Just replace the . in search pattern with [^,]. –  choroba Oct 10 '12 at 14:18
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sed 's/,[^,]*$/,92.2.11.1/g' file

test

kent$  echo "pr,th-klmndisj,92.2.11.1
dquote> da,th-kl532disj,92.2.11.8
dquote> fr,th-klmn4532j,92.2.21.2
dquote> pr,th-klmn52sj,92.2.11.3"|sed 's/,[^,]*$/,92.2.11.1/g'
pr,th-klmndisj,92.2.11.1
da,th-kl532disj,92.2.11.1
fr,th-klmn4532j,92.2.11.1
pr,th-klmn52sj,92.2.11.1
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awk -F, '$3="92.2.11.1"' OFS=, file
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care to comment your code? A couple of lines commenting it will not harm and help explain what this line does and how –  Yaroslav Oct 10 '12 at 11:31
    
The interesting thing of that is when I have newline with no data, awk add something like that: ,,92.2.11.1 –  Kalin Borisov Oct 10 '12 at 11:31
    
<pre> pr,th-klmn52sj,92.2.11.1 </pre> When I have added line without nothing that command added it self addtional commas and IP –  Kalin Borisov Oct 10 '12 at 12:22
1  
If your file contains empty lines, try this: $ awk -F, 'NF>2{$3="92.2.11.1"}1' OFS=, file #NF>2 considers only lines with more than 2 columns. –  Guru Oct 10 '12 at 12:35
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