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I want to have a container (let's say an std::vector) that would hold various inherited types, and would instantiate them,.i.e. vector of classes --> vector of objects.

For instance:

class A{};

class B: public class A
{};

class C: public class A
{};

void main()
{
    std::vector<of inherited A types> typesVec;
    std::vector<A*> objectsVec;

    typesVec.push_back(class B);
    typesVec.push_back(class C);

    for (int i = 0; i < typesVec.size(); i++)
    {
        A* pA = new typesVec.at(i);
        objectsVec.push_back(pA);
    }

}

Thanks in advance..

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Do you need typesVec to be filled dynamically? That is, do you want to include or exclude certains types at runtime? –  Luc Touraille Oct 10 '12 at 12:23
    
You were pretty fast with your acceptance of an answer ... –  phresnel Oct 10 '12 at 12:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This isn't possible in C++ (at least not directly). I can see this happening in a language that has reflection, but C++ doesn't.

What you can do instead is create a factory or simply methods that create objects of the specified type.

Instead of having a vector of types, you'd have a vector of object generators (close enough, right?):

class A{};

class B: public class A
{};

class C: public class A
{};

struct AFactory
{
    virtual A* create() { return new A; }
};
struct BFactory : AFactory
{

    virtual A* create() { return new B; }
};
struct CFactory : AFactory
{

    virtual A* create() { return new C; }
};

//...

typesVec.push_back(new BFactory);
typesVec.push_back(new CFactory);

for (int i = 0; i < typesVec.size(); i++)
{
    A* pA = typesVec.at(i)->create();
    objectsVec.push_back(pA);
}
share|improve this answer
    
"object generators" are also known as factories. –  Alexandre C. Oct 10 '12 at 11:47
    
@AlexandreC. "What you can do instead is create a factory or simply methods that create objects of the specified type." –  Luchian Grigore Oct 10 '12 at 11:49
    
Lucian, Thanks a lot! I was stuck for some time...I indeed ended up using a kind of factory, albeit a slightly different one. –  zuuz Oct 10 '12 at 12:03

Just a quick solution sketch:

The C++ standard does not provide direct calls to constructors. As such you can't have function pointers to constructors; you can, however, have a wrapper function "create", something like:

template<typename T>
T* create () {
   return (new T();
}

Provide overloaded create definitions for one argument, two arguments, ... or try to use variadic templates; or, if you already know what types you need, you can create the create functions specifically. Then you can have a function pointer to the create function:

&create<TheType>

Mind that the signature of this function however depends on the type used. You can however create a struct that contains typdefs for the templated type, a typedef for the type pointer, and the create function as a functor operator().

Thus you can have two vectors, one for the function pointers to the create function, or, alternatively to the structs mentioned before, and one with the actual objects. In your case where you only have inherited types, you might be able to define functions A* createB() { return new B(); }, A* createC() { return new C(); }, ... for each inherited type B, C, ... and have a vector for pointers to these create functions and the second vector for the A pointers.

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I might point you Andrei Alesandrescu´s book Modern C++ Design (or the Loki library he describes in the book) and the chapter about type lists. This would require you to do the typeVec.insert( type ) at compile time.

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There is a reusable approach with templates. This is a generic factory for derived types that comes with an install and a create method which lets you write code like this:

int main() {
    TypeVector<Base> t;
    t.install<Foo>("Foo");
    t.install<Bar>("Bar");

    t.create("Foo")->hello();
}

Note it's a sketch implementation. In the real world, you may provide another template parameter to specify the underlying container type (for few types, vector is probably more efficient than set).

The type-vector is this:

template class Creator;

template <typename Base>
class TypeVector {
public:
    template <typename Derived>
    void install (std::string const &name) ;

    std::shared_ptr<Base> create (std::string const &name) const;

private:
    struct Meta {
        Meta(std::shared_ptr<Creator<Base>> creator, std::string const &name)
            : creator(creator), name(name) {}

        std::shared_ptr<Creator<Base>> creator;
        std::string name;
    };

    std::vector<Meta> creators_;
};

We somehow need a way to store the type in an allocatable manner. We do it like boost::shared_ptr, which combines an abstract base class and a template derived class:

template <typename Base>
class Creator {
public:
    virtual ~Creator() {}        
    virtual std::shared_ptr<Base> create() const = 0;
};

template <typename Base, typename Derived>
class ConcreteCreator : public Creator<Base> {
public:
    virtual std::shared_ptr<Base> create() const {
        return std::shared_ptr<Base>{new Derived()};
    }
};

The "concrete creator" is able to allocate an actual object, and return a pointer-to-base of it.

Finally, here are the implementations of TypeVector::install and TypeVector::create:

template <typename Base>
template <typename Derived>
void
TypeVector<Base>::install (std::string const &name)
{
    creators_.emplace_back(
        std::shared_ptr<Creator<Base>>(new ConcreteCreator<Base, Derived>()),
        name);
}

template <typename Base>
std::shared_ptr<Base> 
TypeVector<Base>::create (std::string const &name) const
{
    for (auto m : creators_) {
        if (name == m.name) return m.creator->create();
    }
    throw std::runtime_error("...");
}

and finally, here's a test:

#include <iostream>
struct Base {
    virtual ~Base() {}
    virtual void hello() const = 0;
};
struct Foo : Base {
    virtual void hello() const { std::cout << "I am a Foo\n"; }
};
struct Bar : Base {
    virtual void hello() const { std::cout << "I am a Bar\n"; }
};

int main() {
    TypeVector<Base> t;
    t.install<Foo>("Foo");
    t.install<Bar>("Bar");

    t.create("Foo")->hello();
}

You can go further and make any constructor callable for code like ...

...
    Bar(Color, Age, int)
...
t.create("Foo", Color::Red, Age::TooOld, 42)

... but this requires an awesome grasp of variadic template argument lists, and how to fold them into a constructor call (can be done and has been done, but it would explode this answer).

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