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I am using fetestexcept() in C99 and it sometimes complains about multiplying floats gives an inexact result (FE_INEXACT). It seems to happen when multiplying float variables with float literals. How can I modify this so fetestexcept() will not complain ?

gcc -std=c99 -lm test.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <fenv.h>

#pragma STDC FENV_ACCESS ON

int main(void)
{
    float a = 1.1f;
    float b = 1.2f;
    float c = a * b * 1.3f;

    int exception = fetestexcept(FE_ALL_EXCEPT);
    if(exception != 0)
    {
        printf("Exception: 0x%x\n", exception); // 0x20 FE_INEXACT
    }

    return 0;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, don't test for FE_INEXACT if you're not interested in that exception? E.g. instead of


int exception = fetestexcept(FE_ALL_EXCEPT);

do


int exception = fetestexcept(FE_ALL_EXCEPT & ~FE_INEXACT);
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But why does it happen only when using float variables ? –  Jane S Oct 10 '12 at 11:47
    
@JaneS: Because the FPU signals exceptions only for floating point operations ? Or what do you mean? –  janneb Oct 10 '12 at 11:49
    
I mean <b>float c = a * b * 1.3f;</b> gives the exception but not <b>float c = 1.1f * 1.2f * 1.3f;</b> –  Jane S Oct 10 '12 at 11:53
    
One guess could be that the version of GCC that you're using doesn't signal FP exceptions when constant folding. Or that you're compiling for 32-bit x86, and the x87 excess precision issue rears its ugly head. In any case, you almost certainly don't want to check for FP_INEXACT unless you're doing something very particular, since more or less anything nontrivial you do will signal that exception. –  janneb Oct 10 '12 at 12:01
1  
GCC computes constant expressions at compile time. Because c is just set at run time to the precomputed value, no loss of precision occurs. If you define the constants as static const float A = 1.1f, B = 1.2f, C = 1.3f; and compile with -O0 (no optimizations), then GCC actually performs the multiplication float c = A * B * C;, and FP_INEXACT gets raised. With default optimizations GCC sees that A, B, and C are all constants, and precomputes the value into c, turning it from a multiplication into a plain assignment. You can see this if you compile to assembly -S. –  Nominal Animal Oct 10 '12 at 12:23
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You can use Diagnostic-Pragmas to ignore certian warnings.

For example, if I were to compile a subset of your code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h> 
#include <fenv.h>  
#pragma STDC FENV_ACCESS ON  
int main(void) {
   float a = 1.1f;
   float b = 1.2f;
   float c = a * b * 1.3f;
   int exception = c;
   return 0;
 } 

With:

gcc -Wall test.c

I'd get a bunch of warnings like:

test.c:22:0: warning: ignoring #pragma STDC FENV_ACCESS [-Wunknown-pragmas]
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:28:11: warning: unused variable ‘exception’ [-Wunused-variable]

Then to silence them you can add the "ignored" pragmas:

#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunknown-pragmas"
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-variable"

Recompile and the warnings go away.

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