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I have this query

select distinct Name,ID from tbl_abc where Name like '%william jam%'

My expected result is

Anderson William James   1
William James            2

and the result coming is

Anderson William James   1
William James            2
William James            3

The data present inside table is

Anderson William James   1
William James            2
William James            3

how can i achieve this. I am trying this from last 2 hours but not getting distinct name.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
select Name,ID
 from tbl_abc where Name like '%william jam%'
group by Name
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thanks it's working. –  Yogesh Suthar Oct 10 '12 at 12:16
    
always welcome... –  vikram jain Oct 10 '12 at 12:20

You can achieve using GROUP BY and if you want ID of the latest record use MAX and for first use MIN of same names

For max

select Name, MAX(ID) from tbl_abc where Name like '%william jam%' GROUP BY Name

For min

select Name, MIN(ID) from tbl_abc where Name like '%william jam%' GROUP BY Name
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+1 I much prefer the explicit nature of selecting the ID over whatever MySQL decides to return because ID is not in the GROUP BY clause. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 10 '12 at 12:19
    
but in either way if we use ID it will give a min value. –  Yogesh Suthar Oct 10 '12 at 12:23
    
@YogeshSuthar - not always. When you don't use an aggregate function on ID and let MySQL implicit select a value for you, it will return the first ID for each Name it encounters. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 10 '12 at 12:26
2  
@YogeshSuthar - In an auto increment column in the current implementation of MySQL I believe it will but you are relying on a DBMS specific feature that will sooner or later come back to bite you. Imagine someone updating the ID (in SQL Server that's possible so I assume it will be possible in MySQL) or altering its column definition or ... Being explicit about it 1) works in all DBMS's I know of and 2) has no performance penalty to speak of compared to the implicit version and most importantly 3) is always correct. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 10 '12 at 13:05
1  
@YogeshSuthar - Oh for heavens sake, do as you please. I give up ;) –  Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 10 '12 at 15:14

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