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Why in STL

std::iterator_traits<const T*>::value_type

is the same type as

std::iterator_traits<T*>::value_type

Why it is designed like that? Shouldn't the first be const T and the second only T? How are you supposed to take the underlying const correct type of an iterator? I know you can write your own template class and specialization and get it from

    std::iterator_traits<const T*>::pointer

but shouldn't there be a member typedef that holds it?

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Could you explain "take the underlying const correct type"? What do you mean by "take"? –  Vaughn Cato Oct 10 '12 at 12:42
    
I mean, if I want to get "const T" from the iterator or from iterator_traits as a member typedef, when the iterator is pointing to a const type. –  Sogartar Oct 10 '12 at 16:00
    
I see. I'm not sure what a good use case would be though. Could you add an example? –  Vaughn Cato Oct 10 '12 at 16:50
    
Let's say you want to get the type iterator_traits<It>::value_type::some_member_const_dependent_type and you want it to be const if It is a const iterator. –  Sogartar Oct 11 '12 at 11:04
    
The constness of T doesn't affect T::type, so having iterator_traits<it>::value_type be const wouldn't help there. –  Vaughn Cato Oct 11 '12 at 13:15
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2 Answers

Constness doesn't matter for the value type, since a value implies a copy. The std::iterator_traits<const T*>::reference is a const T& however.

For example, you can write this function:

template <class Iterator>
typename std::iterator_traits<Iterator>::value_type getValue(Iterator i)
{
  return *i;
}

and it works perfectly fine whether Iterator is a const T * or a T *.

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1  
That function would also work fine if value_type was const T :) –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 10 '12 at 14:01
    
@JonathanWakely: True. I like your example. –  Vaughn Cato Oct 10 '12 at 14:06
    
@JonathanWakely: but would it make sense ? There are restrictions associated with const return types. –  Matthieu M. Oct 10 '12 at 15:21
    
@MatthieuM. it might make sense for class types, without knowing what value_type is you can't say. The point is it works. –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 10 '12 at 16:30
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It allows me to do this:

std::iterator_traits<I>::value_type val = *iter;
val += 5;
doSomething(val);

But that's harder if value_type is const, because I need to use remove_const.

If I don't want to get a modifiable value then it doesn't matter whether value_type is const or not:

const std::iterator_traits<I>::value_type cval = *iter;
std::iterator_traits<I>::reference        ref  = *iter;

Both of these work for const iterators and non-const iterators, and both work whether value_type is const or not, but the first example only works for const iterators if their value_type is non-const.

How are you supposed to take the underlying const correct type of an iterator?

An iterator doesn't necessarily have an underlying type of its own, an iterator usually refers to some range or some collection, and that collection is what has an underlying type. e.g std::list<int>::const_iterator's value_type is std::list<int>::value_type, which is int not const int.

You don't necessarily want to know what the underlying type is anyway, it's more likely you want to know what the result of *iter is, and that's what iterator_traits<I>::reference tells you.

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+1: That's a good example of why it is good for it not to be const. –  Vaughn Cato Oct 10 '12 at 14:05
    
I guess it is so, because it is far more useful, as you point in you examples. –  Sogartar Oct 11 '12 at 11:06
    
Quote: "An iterator doesn't necessarily have an underlying type of its own, an iterator usually refers to some range or some collection, and that collection is what has an underlying type." "const T*" can refer to an iterator to collection of type "const T" or a const iterator to a collection of type "T". It seams there is no way to distinguish what you mean by "std::iterator_traits<const T*>", so it is "better" to assume, that you mean it is a const iterator. –  Sogartar Oct 12 '12 at 10:41
    
It's better not to assume either, and have a consistent model that works for both. –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 12 '12 at 11:10
    
I mean, that std::iterator_traits as is, assumes that "const T*" is a const iterator to a collection of type "T". –  Sogartar Oct 12 '12 at 12:07
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