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There is a java server-side application. Threads number is up to 1000. The app intensely uses NIO for communication, JINI etc.

Would you consider allocating/de-allocating of 400 megabytes per a minute to be fine (acceptable) for a java application at all?

The reason to ask the question - amount of available memory becomes less as time goes on: there is some memory leaks (several megs per day), also amount of used memory depends on amount of work to do (the app caches some things). So there may be a situation with <= 100 megs of free memory. GC becomes crazy of course, as its activity becomes very demanded. (Recommended running time to restart is a month in production)

Heap allocation statistic from VisualVM

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closed as not constructive by Wooble, Kevin, flem, LittleBobbyTables, Woot4Moo Oct 14 '12 at 17:43

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2 Answers 2

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400 MB/sec of garbage is very bad.

400 MB/min of garbage may be ok for your application.

I would try increasing the Eden size via -XX:NewSize= to 1g, 2g or 4g to see if this improves performance.

I would try to estimate how many active threads you have esp if this is more than the number of CPUs you have.

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Threads number is up to 1000.

That is probably too many, IMO. Each thread's stack could occupy up to 1Mb (or more) depending on your platform and the -Xss.

Would you consider allocating/de-allocating of 400 megabytes per a minute to be fine (acceptable) for a java application at all?

That shouldn't be a problem. Indeed, looking at the performance graph, GC looks like a small fraction of CPU time used ... and that is a small fraction of what is available.

The reason to ask the question - amount of available memory becomes less as time goes on: there is some memory leaks (several megs per day),

Well you should consider tracking down and fixing those leaks.

... also amount of used memory depends on amount of work to do (the app caches some things).

The answer to that may be to increase the heap size. And (surprisingly) increasing the heap size can reduce the percentage of time spent garbage collecting. (Though there can be problems with concurrent collectors and really large heaps ...)

So there may be a situation with <= 100 megs of free memory. GC becomes crazy of course, as its activity becomes very demanded.

Yes. This is most likely a result of your storage leaks, rather than a high allocation rate. As a JVM gets closer and closer to running out of Heap, the GC will take an increasing proportion of the overall time to run. It is inevitable. (The GC spends most of its time dealing with objects that are NOT garbage. As the proportion of reclaimable space falls, the cost of reclaiming that space rises.)

There is a workaround to this in the form of the -XX:+UseGCOverheadLimit JVM switch. This uses "a policy that limits the proportion of the VM's time that is spent in GC before an OutOfMemory error is thrown.". Basically, it caused the inevitable OOME to be thrown before your server goes into a death spiral of ever decreasing performance ...

(Recommended running time to restart is a month in production)

... or fix the memory leaks!!!

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