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Right so the question maybe doesn't illustrate what I'm trying to say but here's what I'm trying to achieve. I have got 6 text boxes on a page each of which contains a number between 0 and 500 (there is no limit but I'm not expecting the number to be higher than this). This number is dependent on a calculation elsewhere, but is irrelevant for this question so I've left it out. Anyway, what I'm trying to do is;

Run through a loop and assign a new text box scoreone, scoretwo etc in the code below an index between 1 and 10 based on the size of the values in indexone, indextwo etc.

So for example if indexone contains 15, the textbox scoreone will be populated with 0. Now this works fine, but only for one textbox, as I have six, I'm not sure how to do this for all of them (i.e. one after the other). I'm using JavaScript and jQuery...

HTML:

<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="20" id="indexone" />
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" id="scoreone" /><br>


<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="60" id="indextwo" />
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" id="scoretwo" /><br>


<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="100" id="indexthree"/>
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" id="scorethree" /><br>


<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="160" id="indexfour"/>
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" id="scorefoure" /><br>

<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="180" id="indexfive"/>
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" id="scorefive" /><br>


<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="210" id="indexsix"/>
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" id="scoresix" /><br>

JS:

var indexArray = [indexone, indextwo, indexthree, indexfour, indexfive, indexsix];

for (var i = 0; i < indexArray.length; i++) {
    if ((indexArray[i] >= 0) && (indexArray[i] < 25)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(1);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if ((indexArray[i] >= 25) && (indexArray[i] < 50)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(2);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if ((indexArray[i] >= 50) && (indexArray[i] < 75)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(3);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if ((indexArray[i] >= 75) && (indexArray[i] < 100)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(4);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if ((indexArray[i] >= 100) && (indexArray[i] < 125)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(5);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if ((indexArray[i] >= 125) && (indexArray[i] < 150)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(6);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if ((indexArray[i] >= 150) && (indexArray[i] < 175)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(7);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if ((indexArray[i] >= 175) && (indexArray[i] < 200)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(8);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if ((indexArray[i] >= 200) && (indexArray[i] <= 225)) {
        scoreone = parseInt(9);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }
    else if (indexArray[i] > 225) {
        scoreone = parseInt(10);
        $('#scoreone').val(scoreone);
    }

}

I've put what I'm trying to do in a fiddle here too...

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2  
Why not change what the id's are. So instead of scoreone use score1 and make the name by appending score + i where i is the loop iterator –  NuclearGhost Oct 10 '12 at 14:35
    
what is the point of parseInt(6)? 6 is already an int. –  Marc B Oct 10 '12 at 14:37
    
@MarcB you're right, that's just redundant! I will remove... –  Kiz Oct 10 '12 at 14:41
    
Do you realize the >= checks in all of the ifs are redundant. Of course it is greater or it would have not gotten past the previous steps. –  epascarello Oct 10 '12 at 14:46
    
@epascarello again, you're right. Wtf am I doing. –  Kiz Oct 10 '12 at 14:49
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this working example witch changed words for ints:

jsfiddle

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Excellent. This worked with a bit of tweaking (I didn't need to bind it to an onClick. Thanks so much. –  Kiz Oct 10 '12 at 15:22
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Just use classes and loop through

HTML

<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="20" class="index" />
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" class="score" /><br>


<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="60" class="index" />
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" class="score" /><br>


<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="100" class="index"/>
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" class="score" /><br>


<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="160" class="index"/>
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" class="score" /><br>

<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="180" class="index"/>
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" class="score" /><br>


<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="210" class="index"/>
<input type="text" disabled="disabled" value="0" class="score" /><br>​

JavaScript

//That whole if/else if statement reduced to a calculation
function getValue(val){
    var number = (Math.round(val/100*4)/4)*100/25;
    if (number>10) {
        number = 10;
    }        
    return number;
}

//Find all of the indexes and scores, returned in document order
var indexes = $(".index");
var scores = $(".score");

//loop through indexes and set the value on the corresponding score
indexes.each(function(ind) {
    var index = jQuery(this);
    var score = scores.eq(ind);
    var value = getValue(index.val());
    score.val(value);
});

Running example

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and jquery will magically know what the OP wants to modify only the .score elements that follow immediately after the .index being considered... how? –  Marc B Oct 10 '12 at 14:42
    
Thanks but the problem is, the values for indexone, indextwo etc are always different as they are dependent on other calculations... –  Kiz Oct 10 '12 at 14:43
    
@MarcB the elements are returned in document order so as long as the result is in the same order as the index, there is no problem. –  epascarello Oct 10 '12 at 14:45
    
@Kiz, your comment gives me no more information to go off on. –  epascarello Oct 10 '12 at 14:49
    
@epascarello, sorry what I was trying to say was the values that I'm using to calculate the indexes for, so for example indexone, indextwo etc are actually calculated fields (i.e. the values in these boxes can change). Hope this makes sense –  Kiz Oct 10 '12 at 15:11
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Hope this simplifies:

Update the Ids for the fields to use index number as suffix as score1, score2.. and index1, index2...

Then write a compact java function as below:

 for (var i = 1; i <= 6; i++) {
    $('#score'+i).val(Math.ceil($('#index'+i).val()/25));
  }

If you don't want to change the ids then, I think below should work.

var indexArray = [indexone, indextwo, indexthree, indexfour, indexfive, indexsix];
var scoreArray = [scoreone, scoretwo, scorethree, scorefour, scorefive, scoresix];

 for (var i = 0; i < indexArray.length; i++) {
    $('#'+scoreArray[i]).val(Math.ceil($('#'+indexArray[i]).val()/25));
  }
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