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std::enable_if to conditionally compile a member function

I'm trying to overload the method Foo<T>::bar() for specific types of T as follows -- without success. I'd appreciate pointers and workarounds.

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/type_traits.hpp>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

template<typename T>
struct Foo
{
    typename boost::enable_if_c<boost::is_same<char,T>::value >::type
    bar();

    typename boost::disable_if_c<boost::is_same<char,T>::value >::type
    bar();
};

template<typename T>
typename boost::disable_if_c<boost::is_same<char,T>::value >::type
Foo<T>::bar()
{
    std::cout << "I am generic ..." << std::endl;
}

template<typename T>
typename boost::enable_if_c<boost::is_same<char,T>::value >::type
Foo<T>::bar()
{
    std::cout << "I am specific ..." << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    Foo<char> f;
    f.bar();

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Compiling this on ideone yields the following compiler errors:

prog.cpp:13: error: ‘typename boost::disable_if_c<boost::is_same::value, void>::type Foo<T>::bar()’ cannot be overloaded
prog.cpp:10: error: with ‘typename boost::enable_if_c<boost::is_same::value, void>::type Foo<T>::bar()’
prog.cpp:18: error: prototype for ‘typename boost::disable_if_c<boost::is_same::value, void>::type Foo<T>::bar()’ does not match any in class ‘Foo<T>’
prog.cpp:10: error: candidate is: typename boost::enable_if_c<boost::is_same::value, void>::type Foo<T>::bar()
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1  
+1: Did not know you could use Boost on ideone. –  John Dibling Oct 10 '12 at 14:43
    
You're missing an include: #include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp> (among other issues). –  Luc Touraille Oct 10 '12 at 14:45
    
@LucTouraille makes little difference, but I'll include it anyway. –  Olumide Oct 10 '12 at 14:48
1  
It does make a difference: now the compiler gives you an error message that actually describes the true problem with your code (that is, the fact that you are not using enable_if correctly, as explained in response to the question linked). –  Luc Touraille Oct 10 '12 at 14:51
1  
@Sdra: This is false. –  Luc Touraille Oct 10 '12 at 15:32
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marked as duplicate by Luc Touraille, Mat, Bo Persson, Luc Danton, Graviton Oct 11 '12 at 3:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer

You are using enable_if and disable_if with same parameters. Looks like you are enabling and disabling same template instance and compiler thinks that you are overloading it. Don't use is_same_char in both instances.

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I thought the enable_if made one Foo<T>::bar valid when T=char while the disable_if made Foo<T>::bar valid when T!=char. –  Olumide Oct 10 '12 at 16:29
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