Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to change this code, with a return value and an exception:

public Foo Bar(Bar b)
{
   if(b.Success)
   {
      return b;
   }
   else
   {
      throw n.Exception;
   }
}

to this, which throws separate exceptions for success and failure

public Foo Bar(Bar b)
{
   throw b.Success ? new BarException(b) : new FooException();
}

try
{
   Bar(b)
}
catch(BarException bex)
{
   return ex.Bar;
}
catch(FooException fex)
{
   Console.WriteLine(fex.Message);
}
share|improve this question
    
This appears to be a functional duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/99683/… –  dmckee Aug 15 '09 at 18:06

11 Answers 11

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Throwing an exception is definitely more expensive than returning a value. But in terms of raw cost it's hard to say how much more expensive an exception is.

When deciding on a return value vs. an exception you should always consider the following rule.

Only use exceptions for exceptional circumstances

They shouldn't ever be used for general control flow.

share|improve this answer
6  
There are times when exceptions make sense for general control flow - control flow for which the language has fewer alternatives. For example, consider a recursive descent parser which is investigating a parse path speculatively - when it gives up, it'll want to return from a very deep call tree, and the easiest way to do that without laborious design of every routine is to throw an exception. –  Barry Kelly Aug 15 '09 at 16:44
1  
I dont agree with "Only use exceptions for exceptional circumstances" That rule is far to vague and subjective to be effective. Throwing a "InvalidParameterException" is hardly an exceptional circumstance. –  Alan Aug 15 '09 at 16:45
10  
@Alan: Passing an invalid argument to a method should be an exceptional circumstance. –  Jon Skeet Aug 15 '09 at 17:05
    
I'd say that everything that prevents a program from continuing normally is an exceptional circumstance. –  JulianR Aug 15 '09 at 20:05

In some recent real work performance analysis, we found that tons of exceptions on lower end machines had a critical effect on the application performance, so much so that we are devoting a few weeks to go through and adjust the code to not throw so many.

When I say a critical effect, it was in the ballpark of spiking the dual core CPU up to 95% on the single CPU core the application was using.

share|improve this answer
    
What is the negative vote for? –  Tom Anderson Aug 15 '09 at 19:42

I'm having trouble at the moment finding any documents to support it, but keep in mind that when you throw an exception, C# has to generate a stack trace from the point where you called it. Stack traces (and reflection in general) are far from free.

share|improve this answer
1  
Technically gathering the stack trace is not that expensive. It certainly costs something if data from high up the stack (stack growing down) needs to be pulled into the cache to grab each pushed return address, but that's the only cost that needs to be paid until someone actually asks for the stack trace data. You can lazily do the reflection, and never pay for it if no-one asks. –  Barry Kelly Aug 15 '09 at 16:49

You should prefer Exceptions over error codes, and for error conditions, but don't use exceptions for normal program flow.

Exceptions are extremely heavy duty compared to normal work flow, I've seen a huge order of magnitude decrease in application performance using a try-catch-block.

share|improve this answer

Using error returns will be much more expensive than exceptions - as soon as a piece of code forgets to check the error return, or fails to propagate it.

Still, be sure to not use exceptions for control flow - use them only to indicate that something has gone wrong.

share|improve this answer

You can find a lot of useful information about this in the answers to this question, including one answer with 45 up-votes How slow are .net exceptions?

share|improve this answer
    
Which appears to be incorrect... –  user139593 Aug 15 '09 at 20:11
    
Hmmm, which part of my answer is incorrect, angryboy? The URL, the answers to that question, the fact that Jon had 45 up-votes (now 49), or my assertion that there is a "lot of useful information" there? –  DOK Aug 15 '09 at 20:44
    
I did not say that any part of you answer was incorrect DOK. If I had intended that, then I would have said "this is incorrect". Rather, I was responding to your reference: "...including one answer with 45 up-votes", with: "Which appears to be incorrect.", as in, the content of the answer that you are referencing appears to be incorrect. –  RBarryYoung Aug 16 '09 at 3:46
    
Thanks for the clarification. It would be really helpful if you amplified on that in an answer to the other question. If Jon's high-scoring answer is incorrect, you would be doing everyone a real service to explain there how it is incorrect (beyond your brief comment there). This is such an important issue, and you obviously have in-depth experience with it. –  DOK Aug 16 '09 at 15:38

Exception have two costs: warm-up to page in the exception infrastructure - if not in to memory then into the CPU cache - and per-throw cost to gather exception stack, search for exception handler, possibly call exception filters, unwind the stack, calling finalization blocks - all operations that the runtime, by design, does not optimize for.

Thus, measuring the cost of throwing exceptions can be misleading. If you write a loop that iteratively throws and catches an exception, without a lot of work between the throw site and the catch site, the cost won't look that large. However, that's because it's amortizing the warm-up cost of exceptions, and that cost is harder to measure.

Certainly, exceptions don't cost anything like they seem to if one's main experience is exceptions thrown by programs under the debugger. But they do cost, and it's advisable to design libraries in particular such that exceptions can be avoided where necessary for optimization.

share|improve this answer
    
It's the catching that incurs the cost to gather the stack, search for handlers, etc. not the throwing. –  Scott Dorman Aug 15 '09 at 16:48
    
Gathering the stack can be relatively trivially made quite cheap. Usually only a few dozen words need be copied from memory that's in a contiguous block almost never more than 1MB in size. The search for handlers is similarly cheap, but calling filter routines can cause pulling in lots of other code, and if the exception dispatching and stack unwinding logic isn't optimized for frequent exception throwing, setting up the stack frame etc. for each step of the whole operation can add up. –  Barry Kelly Aug 15 '09 at 16:53
2  
@Scott: I don't see that it makes any point to differentiate between throwing and catching. They're inextricably linked - you can't have one without the other, so it makes no difference what you call it. –  Jon Skeet Aug 15 '09 at 17:05

Throwing an exception is a relatively inexpensive operation. It's catching them that incurrs the cost because of the stack walks that must occur to find the catch handlers, execute the code in the catch handlers, find the finally blocks, execute the code in the finally blocks, and then return to the original caller.

It is strongly recommended that you don't use exceptions for control flow. Using return codes to indicate errors gets expensive from a "time and materials" perspective as it will eventually incur maintenance costs.

All of that aside, your two examples don't match nor are they even valid. Since you are return b, which is of type Bar, your first method should probably be:

public Bar Foo(Bar b)
{
   if(b.Success)
   {
      return b;
   }
   else
   {
      throw n.Exception;
   }
}

which could be rewritten as:

public Bar Foo(Bar b)
{
   if (!b.Success)
      throw n.Exception;

   return b;
}
share|improve this answer

Generally I've avoided this because of the expensive nature of catching the exception. It may not be too bad if it's not something that happens often.

However, why not just return null? Then it becomes this:

public Foo Bar(Bar b)
{
   if(b.Success)
   {
      return b;
   }
   else
   {
      return null;
   }
}

And then whenever you call Bar() you just check to ensure that the returned value is not null before using the value. This is a far less expensive operation. And I figure it's a good practice because this is the technique Microsoft has used all over the place in many of .NET's built-in functions.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a very bad practice, because of the chance someone will forget to check for null. It also litters the code with checks for something that's meant to happen rarely, obscuring what the code is actually meant to do. –  John Saunders Aug 15 '09 at 19:45
    
"This is a very bad practice, because of the chance someone will forget to check for null." - Couldn't the same be said for throwing an exception? If you throw an exception you need to remember to catch it. –  Steve Wortham Aug 15 '09 at 23:14
    
I guess my point is that in either case this will come back to bite you if you don't write the code that surrounds the function call properly. The difference is that my method is much, much faster than throwing and catching an exception. –  Steve Wortham Aug 15 '09 at 23:30

Using the code below, testing revealed that the the call+return with no exceptions took about 1.6 microseconds per iteration, whereas exceptions (throw plus catch) added about 4000 microseconds each.(!)

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
        bool PreCheck = chkPrecheck.Checked;
        bool NoThrow = chkNoThrow.Checked;
        int divisor = (chkZero.Checked ? 0 : 1);
        int Iterations =  Convert.ToInt32(txtIterations.Text);
        int i = 0;
        ExceptionTest x = new ExceptionTest();
        int r = -2;
        int stat = 0;

        for(i=0; i < Iterations; i++)
        {
            try
            {
                r = x.TryDivide(divisor, PreCheck, NoThrow);
            }
            catch
            {
                stat = -3;
            }

        }

        DateTime stop = DateTime.Now;
        TimeSpan elapsed = stop - start;
        txtTime.Text = elapsed.TotalMilliseconds.ToString();

        txtReturn.Text = r.ToString();
        txtStatus.Text = stat.ToString();

    }
}



class ExceptionTest
{
    public int TryDivide(int quotient, bool precheck, bool nothrow)
    {
        if (precheck)
        {
            if (quotient == 0)
            {
                if (nothrow)
                {
                    return -9;
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new DivideByZeroException();
                }

            }
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                int a;
                a = 1 / quotient;
                return a;
            }
            catch
            {
                if (nothrow)
                {
                    return -9;
                }
                else
                {
                    throw;
                }
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}

So yes, Exceptions are VERY expensive.

And before someone says it, YES, I tested this in Release mode and not just Debug mode. Try the code yourself and see if you get significantly different results.

share|improve this answer
5  
+1: for actually testing it instead of just pontificating. Why do programmers argue about stupid stuff that they could just measure? Makes me angry, grrrr... –  user139593 Aug 15 '09 at 20:09
1  
Thanks for posting these results. I knew it'd be a big difference. But that's a REALLY big difference. Good stuff. –  Steve Wortham Aug 15 '09 at 23:23
1  
I think this should be the accepted answer, for it gives measurable reasoning –  shabby Dec 12 '13 at 13:54

I saw many different systems where exceptions were considered an indication of a software problem and also means to provide info about events leading to it. That is always heavy on the system. There were systems however where exception was not exceptional as language itself used the same or similar methods to return from routine etc. So it boils down to how exceptions are embedded in the language and system. I made my measurements in java and in a proprietary system I work on right now and the results were as expected - exceptional, exceptions were (20-25)% more expensive.

This does not have to be the rule. I wonder for instance how does python stand on this. I do not do any python development anymore so I am not going to investigate.

As a possibly interesting anecdotal evidence take this: in proprietary system I worked on few years back an unintelligent use of exceptions for protocol violations led to serious problems and outage of one of our production systems. Exceptions were used to indicate missing or corrupt mandatory field in a message received from outside. All was well till one sunny day some less skilled company produced a node which, when put into operation, caused lots of trouble. The exceptions had to be removed as we could not cope with even low level of signalling from faulty node. The fault was indeed also on our side - instead to follow protocol spec which described what to do with badly formatted messages (ignore and step the signalling fault counter) we tried to detect and debug software fault in external node. If exceptions were less expensive this would not be such a big deal.

In fact while testing security these days I have always a TC or few that do exactly that - generate high volume of protocol violation situations. If developers use exceptions to handle those then the system can be brought to its knees quite easily. When this once fails I will start measuring the difference again....

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.