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I'm trying to create a method which will add a char* to a LinkedList, ensuring that the linkedList is always sorted alphabetically. I have been given code to define a LinkedItem struct:

// Define our list item as 'struct ListItem', and also 
// typedef it under the same name.
typedef struct ListItem {
  char *s;
  struct ListItem *p_next;
} ListItem;

I have also been given a method to add an item to the beginning of a list:

// Adds a new item to the beginning of a list, returning the new
// item (ie the head of the new list *)
ListItem* add_item(ListItem *p_head, char *s) {  
    // Allocate some memory for the size of our structure.
    ListItem *p_new_item = malloc(sizeof(ListItem));
    p_new_item->p_next = p_head;       // We are the new tail.
    p_new_item->s = s;     // Set data pointer. 
    return p_new_item;
}

Now here's my code, I'll explain more after:

ListItem* addSortedItem(ListItem *p_head, char *s){         
    if(p_head==NULL)//if the list is empty, we add to the beginning
        return add_item(p_head,s);
    ListItem* p_new_item = malloc(sizeof(ListItem));
    ListItem *p_current_item = p_head; //makes a pointer to the head of the list


    while (p_current_item) {    // Loop while the current pointer is not NULL
        printf("entering while loop with current=%s\n",p_current_item->s);
        // now we want to look at the value contained and compare it to the value input     
        if(aThenB(s,p_current_item->s)!=TRUE){
            // if A goes after B, we want to go on to look at the next element
            p_current_item=p_current_item->p_next;
        } else if (aThenB(s,p_current_item->s)==TRUE) {printf("entered elseif\n");      
            p_head=add_item(p_current_item,s);
            return p_head;          
        } else {printf("WHY DID WE EVER REACH THE ELSE!?"); return p_head;}
    }
}

Now, aThenB(StringA,StringB) returns TRUE if the correct sorted order of A and B is A, then B, and false otherwise- equality is also an option, I simply haven't gotten this to work well enough to allow that :-)

What is happening with my test data (which is "sheep i", with i from 0-10) is that either I am only returning one element back, or i am randomly skipping elements, depending on the order input. I can include more code but it's a bit messy.

I think my problem is stemming from not fully understanding the pointers and how they work- I want to ensure that p_head is always pointing to the head, whilst p_current is roving through the list. But I'm also getting seg faults when p_current reaches the last element, so I'm not sure where I'm going wrong.

Thank you for any help on how to get my code to return properly :-)

Edit: addSortedItem() is called in the following block in the main method:

    // The empty list is represented by a pointer to NULL.
    ListItem *p_head = NULL;
    ListItem *p_head2=NULL;
    // Now add some items onto the beginning of the list.
    int i;
    for (i=0; i<NO_ITEMS; i++) {

    // Allocate some memory for our string, and use snprintf to
    // create a formatted string (see GNU API docs) much like printf
    // but instead writing to memory rather than the screen.
    char* s = malloc(MAX_DATA_CHARS);
    snprintf(s, (size_t) MAX_DATA_CHARS, "sheep %d", i);
    p_head = addSortedItem(p_head, s);
    }
share|improve this question
    
what does aThenB() do? –  Gung Foo Oct 10 '12 at 15:10
    
it compares the two parameters (stringA and stringB), one character at a time, and returns FALSE (0) if stringB<stringA; TRUE (1) if stringA<stringB; stringA==stringB is a separate case which I've got a function equals(StringA,StringB) for, that returns TRUE if they are equal. –  benbenbenbenben Oct 10 '12 at 15:14
    
Please include the code that calls addSortedItem. There are plenty of opportunities to mess things up there, because of the way the function transfers ownership of the string to the linked list. –  dasblinkenlight Oct 10 '12 at 15:16
    
added it above :-) bit of trouble formatting. –  benbenbenbenben Oct 10 '12 at 15:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you have an error in the add of a new element in the middle or in the end of the linked list. in your addStoredItem function you make a pointer from your newItem to the currentItem but you do not take account to have a link from previous element to the newItem

initial linked list befor calling addStoredItem

item1-->item2-->item4-->item5

Linked list afetr calling addStoredItem in order to add item3

item1-->item2-->item4-->item5
                ^
                |
                item3

so as you can see you have added the new item at the head of the sub linked list starting from item4 but you do not make link from item2 to item3 so that we have to keep a pointer to the previous item in order to complete the link.

the add_item() function allow to add item in the head

The same thing if you try to add item at the end of the linked list

item1-->item2-->item4-->item5    NULL
                                 ^
                                 |
                                 item6

the item6 has added as separate head and there is no link from item5 (previous) to item6 (new)

so your addStoredItem() function could be fixed like this

ListItem* addSortedItem(ListItem *p_head, char *s){         
    if(p_head==NULL)//if the list is empty, we add to the beginning
        return add_item(p_head,s);
    struct ListItem* p_new_item = malloc(sizeof(ListItem));
    ListItem *p_current_item = p_head; //makes a pointer to the head of the list
    ListItem *p_prev_item = NULL; //FIXED

    while (p_current_item) {    // Loop while the current pointer is not NULL
        printf("entering while loop with current=%s\n",p_current_item->s);
        // now we want to look at the value contained and compare it to the value input     
        if(aThenB(s,p_current_item->s)!=TRUE){
            // if A goes after B, we want to go on to look at the next element
            p_prev_item = p_current_item; //FIXED
            p_current_item=p_current_item->p_next;
        } else if (aThenB(s,p_current_item->s)==TRUE) {printf("entered elseif\n");      
            break;        
        } else {printf("WHY DID WE EVER REACH THE ELSE!?"); return p_head;}
    }

    if (p_prev_item!=NULL) //FIXED
        p_prev_item->p_next=add_item(p_current_item,s); //FIXED
    else //FIXED
        p_head=add_item(p_current_item,s);//FIXED
    return p_head; //FIXED
}

the fixed lines are indicated with //FIXED

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain the line p_prev_item->p_next=add_item(p_current_item,s);? I've tried implementing this (blindly) and it works but i'm a bit confused what is actually happening. Here's what my understanding of pointers says: the first arrow means that we are dealing with a pointer to the pointer contained in the p_prev_item struct; which i believe is a similar idea to a double pointer (**p). before that line, p_prev->p_next = current_item (by definition); so why can't we just change what current_item is by saying p_current_item=add_item(p_current_item,s); –  benbenbenbenben Oct 10 '12 at 17:53
    
answer updated for more explanation –  MOHAMED Oct 10 '12 at 18:16
    
Thanks! :-) there's still an issue with it- it's still unable to put things in the middle properly. But I'm going to give it a go to work myself on that issue first :-) –  benbenbenbenben Oct 10 '12 at 18:25

At first, your p_head is NULL, so when you enter your addSortedItem function you create the list and add the first string. That's alright.
But then, upon adding the second item (which in your case is "sheep 1"), you enter your while (p_current_item) loop. The call to aThenB returns FALSE and you go to your next element which is.. NULL! Indeed, at this time, p_head looks like this:

p_head {
s = "sheep 0",
p_next = NULL
}

Your while condition is not true and you exit your function, nothing was added.
You could add a condition in your first if like:

if (p_current_item->next == NULL)
  p_current_item->next = addSortedItem(NULL, s);
else
  p_current_item = p_current_item->next;

Also, saying that p_head=add_item(p_current_item,s); is wrong. Suppose your list is something like:

"sheep 1" -> "sheep 2" -> "sheep 4" -> "sheep 5"

If you add "sheep 3", you will get this:

"sheep 1" -> "sheep 2" -> "sheep 3" -> "sheep 4" -> "sheep 5"
                          ^
                          |
                          p_head

You won't be able to add "sheep 0" anymore. Don't return the return value of addSortedItem as the new p_head

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know I could pass a null parameter. ... That would then make p_current->next be the head of a new list, the head of which contains s and the second(tail) element of which is null? –  benbenbenbenben Oct 10 '12 at 17:59

Support stuff:

#define FALSE 0
#define TRUE 1
#define aThenB(a,b) (strcmp(a,b) <=0 ? TRUE : FALSE)

All the special cases can be avoided by modifying the function's signature to accept a pointer to pointer.

void addSortedItem(ListItem **pp_head, char *s){         
    ListItem *p_new_item ;

    for (       ;*pp_head; pp_head = &(*pp_head)->p_next) {    
        if (aThenB(s,(*pp_head)->s)==FALSE) break;
    }

    p_new_item = malloc(sizeof *p_new_item);
    p_new_item->s = s;

    p_new_item->p_next = *pp_head;
    *pp_head = p_new_item;
}

The caller should do:

ListItem *root = NULL;
addSortedItem( &root, "sheep#0");
share|improve this answer
    
this is a bit over my head. What goes into the blank section of the for declaration? –  benbenbenbenben Oct 10 '12 at 17:54
    
Nothing. The for() loop just starts with the **p_head (the first argument to the function). *pp_head==NULL signifies the end of the list. (which could mean: the beginning of an empty list) –  wildplasser Oct 10 '12 at 17:57
    
ah. so its the same idea as while(*p_head): if *pp_head is null, then the while loop exits; this way we increment in the next bit. so pp_head=&(*pp_head)->p_next) is saying that the pp_head argument (which is a double pointer) is now going to point itself to the address that ... no i don't understand. Again, the pointers are really confusing me still. I have a background in Java so this is really my first time working with them. –  benbenbenbenben Oct 10 '12 at 18:08
    
Use pencil and paper: The whole net effect of the insertion is that somewhere a pointer to a ListItem should get the address of the freshly allocated ListItem object (and the fresh object will steal the old value). This pointer could be the head/root of the list, or a ->p_next pointer somewhere in the chain. And: to change something, you need it's address. To change a pointer, you need the address of that pointer. Ergo: pointer-to-pointer. QED. –  wildplasser Oct 10 '12 at 18:18

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