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On MSVC v9.0, if I do this:

int myvalue;
myvalue = true ? 1 : 0;

then it seems that ?: is evaluated before '='. Is this a guarantee? I am using this table as a reference: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/operator_precedence

However, both operators are in the same row, so I'm not sure if they are evaluated in the order I expect or if this is guaranteed by the standard. Can anyone clarify this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From your link:

Operators that are in the same cell (there may be several rows of operators listed in a cell) are evaluated with the same precedence, in the given direction. For example, the expression a=b=c is parsed as a=(b=c), and not as (a=b)=c because of right-to-left associativity.

Since both = and ?: are in the same cell and have right-to-left associativity, the ternary is guaranteed to evaluate first.

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Thanks, this is exactly what I needed to know. I've usually visited that page only to pay attention to the table itself, I never realized there was more to read below it! My mistake entirely! –  void.pointer Oct 10 '12 at 16:04

In this statement

int myvalue = true ? 1 : 0;

there's only one operator, the ternary operator. There's no assignment operator here, so precedence doesn't matter.

Don't confuse initialization with assignment:

int myvalue;
myvalue = true ? 1 : 0; // now priorities are important
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1  
my example is wrong, my mistake. I am actually asking about your modified version –  void.pointer Oct 10 '12 at 15:58
    
Then see @Mark Ransom's answer –  Kos Oct 10 '12 at 15:59
    
don't confuse declarations and statements: int myvalue = true ? 1 : 0; is a declaration. –  ouah Oct 10 '12 at 16:02
    
@ouah declaration statement is a type of statement syntactically, just like expression statements and compound statements for instance –  Kos Oct 10 '12 at 16:03
1  
@RobertDailey C99, 6.7p5 "A definition of an identifier is a declaration for that identifier that [...]:" –  ouah Oct 10 '12 at 16:09

They are evaluated right to left, as it written in the table you linked. It is equivalent of this:

int myvalue = (true ? 1 : 0);
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Right-to-left:

int myValue1 = 20, myValue2 = 30;

myValue1 = true ? 1 : 0; // which is the same as:
myValue1 = ((true) ? (1) : (0));

// myValue == 1 && myValue2 == 30

true ? myValue1 : myValue2 = 5; // which is the same as:
(true) ? (myValue1) : ((myValue2) = (5));

// myValue == 1 && myValue2 == 30

false ? myValue1 : myValue2 = 5; // which is the same as:
(false) ? (myValue1) : ((myValue2) = (5));

// myValue == 1 && myValue2 == 5

This is guaranteed in the C++ language

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