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the requirement I have is to check a string and based on particular set of chars either insert or replace with prefix string

$prefix = "DV1";

Following are my source $input strings:

SS7.ABCWT2.RSND.LTE1.QR
IT4.ABCET2.VCE2.QR
Y88.ABCNT2.MIM.EDR2.QR
9C5.ABCS.MIM.EDR2.QR

the first chars before first . can be of any length but after the first . the chars ABC remain constant followed by any one character - these four chars will always be there in my input string. after these 4 chars, the i/p string may have two alphanumeric chars - T2 in this case.

what needs to be done is check if $input has "T2" (can be any two alphanum chars) and if it has then replace those 2 chars with D1 (any two chars from $prefix)

if $input does not have "T2", then insert $prefix

share|improve this question
    
I do not understand the specification. Can you add more input data plus expected output or clarify the algorithm? –  choroba Oct 10 '12 at 15:55
    
What have you tried ? –  Jean Oct 10 '12 at 16:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This can be done quite straightforwardly with a single substitution. This program demonstrates

The pattern looks for the sequence .ABC followed by any non-dot character. The \K protects that part of the pattern from being changed. Then there may be two optional non-dot characters, followed by a dot. The replacement string is D1 if the two optional characters were present, or the value of $prefix if not

use strict;
use warnings;

my $prefix = 'DV1';

while (<DATA>) {
  s/\.ABC[^.]\K([^.]{2})?(?=\.)/$1 ? 'D1' : $prefix/e;
  print;
}

__DATA__
SS7.ABCWT2.RSND.LTE1.QR
IT4.ABCET2.VCE2.QR
Y88.ABCNT2.MIM.EDR2.QR
9C5.ABCS.MIM.EDR2.QR

output

SS7.ABCWD1.RSND.LTE1.QR
IT4.ABCED1.VCE2.QR
Y88.ABCND1.MIM.EDR2.QR
9C5.ABCSDV1.MIM.EDR2.QR
share|improve this answer
    
@Borodin.. Wanted to confirm, wouldn't your while load the complete file in the memory?? Or does it rather happen in case of foreach?? –  Rohit Jain Oct 10 '12 at 17:47
    
Thanks to gurus ... I was stuck in this for couple of hrs. :) –  alkeshr Oct 10 '12 at 18:04
    
A while (<>) { ... } loop like this reads only a single line of data at a time. If you write for (<>) { ... } then Perl will read the entire file into memory and then loop over the lines it has stored –  Borodin Oct 10 '12 at 21:26

Here's the code you can try..

I am assuming that, T2 can be a string of length 2 any alphanumeric characters.. It can be A4, or 5B...

#!/perl/bin
use v5.14;
use warnings;

my $str = "9C5.ABCS.MIM.EDR2.QR";
my $str1 = "SS7.ABCWT2.RSND.LTE1.QR";

my $prefix = "DV1";

my $file = 'D:\Programming\Perl\Learning Perl\chapter_1\demo.txt';


open my $fh, '<', $file or die $!;

foreach (<$fh>) {

    if (m/(^.*\.ABC\w)\w{2}\./g) {
        s/(^.*\.ABC\w)\w{2}\./$1D1\./;
    } else {
        s/(^.*\.ABC\w)\./$1$prefix\./;
    }
    say;  # Takes current line as default($_). We don't need to specify it.
}

Input File: -

SS7.ABCWT2.RSND.LTE1.QR
IT4.ABCEX4.VCE2.QR
Y88.ABCN5W.MIM.EDR2.QR
9C5.ABCS.MIM.EDR2.QR

Output: -

SS7.ABCWD1.RSND.LTE1.QR  # Replace T2
IT4.ABCED1.VCE2.QR       # Replace X4
Y88.ABCND1.MIM.EDR2.QR   # Replace 5W    
9C5.ABCSDV1.MIM.EDR2.QR  # Does not contains T2. Add DV1
share|improve this answer
    
The \w pattern matches upper and lower case letters, digits, and the underscore, so it is equivalent to [A-Za-z0-9_]. There is no point in including the digits a second time with [\w\d]. –  Borodin Oct 10 '12 at 16:36
    
@Borodin.. I didn't knew that.. So shall I replace it with just [\w]?? –  Rohit Jain Oct 10 '12 at 16:37
    
Just \w is fine on its own –  Borodin Oct 10 '12 at 16:38
    
@Borodin You are right.. I cross-checked.. It works.. I edited the code accordingly.. :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 10 '12 at 16:38
    
@Borodin.. Actually I am still learning Perl.. So, I keep on forgetting things.. Will need lots of practice.. Thanks :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 10 '12 at 16:39

Try the following code, and tell me if it fits your needs :

#!/usr/bin/perl -l

use strict;
use warnings;

my $text =<<EOF;
SS7.ABCWT2.RSND.LTE1.QR
IT4.ABCET2.VCE2.QR
Y88.ABCNT2.MIM.EDR2.QR
9C5.ABCS.MIM.EDR2.QR
EOF

my $prefix = "DV1";

for (split "\n", $text) {
    s/^(\w+\.ABC\w)T2/$1D1/ || s/^/$prefix/;
    print;
}

OUTPUT

SS7.ABCWD1.RSND.LTE1.QR
IT4.ABCED1.VCE2.QR
Y88.ABCND1.MIM.EDR2.QR
DV19C5.ABCS.MIM.EDR2.QR
share|improve this answer
    
Shorter version in my post. –  sputnick Oct 10 '12 at 16:18
    
This code doesn't appear to do the if $input does not have "T2", then insert $prefix part of the specification –  Borodin Oct 10 '12 at 16:46
    
It's more constructive to tell me what I misunderstood than downvote –  sputnick Oct 10 '12 at 17:12
    
@sputnick.. Not my downvote but you reversed the specification.. if $input does not have "T2", then insert $prefix -> You have inserted D1 and if it contains T2 you have replaced with $prefix. But that doesn't deserve a down vote I think.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 10 '12 at 17:41
    
this also helps....its not my downvote sputnick.thanks for your help :) –  alkeshr Oct 10 '12 at 20:08

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