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I'd like to provide a download link for a CSV that I've generated in Javascript in the browser. Data URI's are an obvious choice, but they don't work in IE for CSV.

Question #1: is there any cross-browser way to do this completely client-side?

I'm pretty sure the answer is no. The next approach would be to generate a link, something like /data_download?data=..., and have a corresponding server-side resource that just responds with the contents of the data field from the querystring. The problem now seems to be that IE's max URL length is something around 2 KB, and I don't want to build that limit into my system.

So I made a server-side resource such that I can POST to /data_download with form data where the 'data' attribute is the CSV contents, and it responds with the form's 'data' field. This seems to work, but it's a pain b/c I need to have a <form> in the client-side markup, and even though I set the mimetype correctly, I get warnings in the browser that make me think this is going to break in some browsers:

Resource interpreted as Document but transferred with MIME type text/csv: "http://localhost:8001/data_download"

Question #2: is there a better way do do this that has some or all of the following characteristics:

  • stateless: I'm not goint to create tokens on the server or anything that requires storing state between requests
  • uses a GET request: so that I can just have a <link> tag instead of an entire <form>
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Your warning might be because data_download does not set the right Content-Type header. –  Christian Bock Oct 10 '12 at 16:06
    
good thinking, but yes, i'm specifying the Content-Type header correctly in data_download. i'll update the question. –  aaronstacy Oct 10 '12 at 18:11
1  
Make a server-side proxy and send the data via POST, not GET. –  Diodeus Oct 10 '12 at 18:18
    
I'm getting this same warning but only in chrome. Do you set cacheability anywhere? I read that might be connected (I set the page the CSV page is called from to not cache) –  Don Rhummy Feb 10 '13 at 9:32

1 Answer 1

Take a look at http://tshrestha.blogspot.com/2013/05/stupid-download-of-browser-self.html The data-uri with filename (download attribute of anchor element) is supporte by FF20+ and Chrome.

You can make it work completely client-side in IE in a way though:

if(/MSIE/.test(navigator.userAgent) && document.execCommand) {
    var oWin = window.open("about:blank", "_blank");
    oWin.document.write("your text goes here");
    oWin.document.close();
    var success = oWin.document.execCommand('SaveAs', true)
    oWin.close();
    return false; //do NOT follow the link
} 

The problem is the user HAS to provide the filename + the .csv or whatever other extension. :-(

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