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I have a CSS-based navigation element that drops down sub-categories and then runs them out horizontally below. Like this:

navigation screenshot

When the user mouses over a main item, it displays a silver background, and when the user mouses over a subnav item, it turns amber. It is also displayed that way on the active page.

The list is structured in a typical fashion:

<div id="cv-nav">
    <ul>
        <a href="#"><li>Item 1</li></a>
        <a href="#"><li>Item2
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Item 2a</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Item 2b</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li></a>
        <a href="#"><li>Item 3</li></a>
        <ahref="#"><li>Item 4
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Item 4a</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Item 4b</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li></a>
        <a href="#"><li>Item 5</li></a>
    </ul>
</div>

And the CSS makes everything work properly:

#cv-nav {
    background-image: url("nav-background");
    background-position: left top;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    height: 50px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 165px;
    width: 1024px;
}
#cv-nav ul {
    height: 50px;
    position: relative;
    width: 1024px;
}
#cv-nav ul li {
    float: left;
    height: 50px;
    margin: 0 1px;
    padding: 0;
    text-align: center;
}
#cv-nav ul a li, #cv-nav ul li a {
    color: #D0D2D2;
    text-transform: uppercase;
    font-family: "Helvetica Neue Black Italic",Helvetica,sans-serif;
    font-size: 12px;
    letter-spacing: 1px;
    line-height: 50px;
}
#cv-nav ul li:hover ul li a {
    color: #D0D2D2;
    font-family: "Helvetica Neue Black Italic",Helvetica,sans-serif;
    text-transform: uppercase;
    font-size: 12px;
    letter-spacing: 1px;
    line-height: 30px;
}
#cv-nav ul li:hover, #cv-nav ul a li:hover, #cv-nav ul li.active {
    background-image: url("silver-button");
    background-position: left top;
    background-repeat: repeat-x;
}
#cv-nav ul li ul li:hover {
    background: none;
}

#cv-nav ul li:hover a, #cv-nav ul a li:hover, #cv-nav ul li:hover p, #cv-nav ul li.active a, #cv-nav ul a li.active, #cv-nav ul li.active p {
    color: #4f4f51;
    font-family: "Helvetica Neue Black Italic",Helvetica,sans-serif;
    text-transform: uppercase;

}

#cv-nav ul li ul li a:hover, #cv-nav ul li ul.active li a:hover, #cv-nav ul li ul.active li.active, #cv-nav ul li ul.active li.active a  {
    color: #FAB631;
    font-family: "Helvetica Neue Black Italic",Helvetica,sans-serif;
    text-transform: uppercase;
    background:none;
}

#cv-nav ul li ul {
    display: none;
    clear: both;
}

#cv-nav ul li:hover ul, #cv-nav ul li.hover ul, #cv-nav ul li ul.active {
    display: inline;
    height: 30px;
    left: 0;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0 0 0 40px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 50px;
    width: 984px;
    background-image: url("subnav-background");
    background-position: left top;
    background-repeat: repeat-x;
}
#cv-nav ul li ul li{
    position:relative;
    float:left;
}

#cv-nav ul li ul li, #cv-nav ul li ul li a, #cv-nav ul li ul.active li, #cv-nav ul li ul.active li a {
    color: #D0D2D2;
    float: left;
    font-family: "Helvetica Neue Black Italic",Helvetica,sans-serif;
    font-size: 12px;
    height: 30px;
    letter-spacing: 0.1em;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0px 10px 0 0;
    text-transform: uppercase;
    line-height: 30px;
}​

In IE, however, the browser treats the nested <ul>s as just another <li>, and floats it in next to preceding item:

Nav in IE

You can see that the placement and styling of the subnav elements is (sort of) correct, but the nest <ul> shouldn't be its own button. I've tried adding a clear:both; property to the #cv-nav ul li ul element, but to no avail.

This has to be something simple that I've overlooked. Any assistance is appreciated.

Here is a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/tylonius/AD7VL/

ty

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I discovered the issue:

The client wanted the entire <li> element to be clickable, not just the label. For elements that didn't have nested lists within them, it worked fine. For the ones that did, however, having them all within a single <a> element confused IE.

Moving the <a> to surround the label solved the issue.

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