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i'm using this code to change all element attributes, how to skip in this code for not change any elemnt: for example,

$('[id^="lbl"] ! lbl1 ! lbl2').attr("disabled", true);

in that code lbl1 and lbl2 must be not change

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api.jquery.com/not –  j08691 Oct 10 '12 at 16:17

3 Answers 3

I'd suggest:

$('[id^="lbl"]').not('#lbl1, #lbl2').prop("disabled", true);

Please note that you should, with attribute-equals/attribute-starts-with selectors, supply an identifying element-type (if possible), to reduce the amount of work jQuery has to do to find the given elements.

You could also use filter():

$('[id^="lbl"]').filter(
    function(){
        var id = this.id;
        return id !== 'lbl1' && id !== 'lbl2';
    }).prop('disabled',true);

References:

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1  
I think it should be .not('#lbl1, #lbl2') –  Vega Oct 10 '12 at 16:17
    
@Vega: indeed it should! edited/corrected =) –  David Thomas Oct 10 '12 at 16:18

Try using not selector,

$('[id^="lbl"]').not('#lbl1, #lbl2').prop("disabled", true);

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/vQFdM/

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$('[id^="lbl"]:not("#lbl1, #lbl2")').attr("disabled", true);
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Using .prop is more appropriate instead of .attr –  Vega Oct 10 '12 at 16:19
    
@Vega just in case you are using modern jquery versions, then attr is ok too –  Oscar Jara Oct 10 '12 at 16:20
    
@OscarJara I am not sure.. I use .prop anywhere it is boolean and .attr for string –  Vega Oct 10 '12 at 16:28

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