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I found a post here were someone managed to read information from a file and sort out the most commonly used words and return how many times each word was used. The input was from a command line argument but I want to get the same script to be executed and then take the filename to be run through the script as input. I can't find what I'm doing wrong.

print "Type the name of the file: ";
chomp(my $file = <>);

open (FILE, "$file") or die;

while (<FILE>){
    $seen{$_}++ for split /\W+/;
}

my $count = 0;
for (sort {
    $seen{$b} <=> $seen{$a}
              ||
       lc($a) cmp lc($b)
              ||
          $a  cmp  $b
} keys %seen)
{
    next unless /\w/;
    printf "%-20s %5d\n", $seen{$_}, $_;
    last if ++$count > 100;
}
close (FILE);

My result at the moment is:

15                       0
15                       0
10                       0
10                       0
10                       0
5                        1
5                        0
5                        0
5                        0
5                        0

The result I want is:

<word>             <number of occurances>
<word>             <number of occurances>
<word>             <number of occurances>
<word>             <number of occurances>
<word>             <number of occurances>
<word>             <number of occurances>
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5  
It'd be helpful if you told us HOW this is not working. –  Marc B Oct 10 '12 at 16:21
    
This program hasn't produced the output you show: there is no way the counts in %seen can be zero. But apart from being poor-quality Perl your program works fine. Try it with a different input file –  Borodin Oct 10 '12 at 16:54

3 Answers 3

The line

printf "%-20s %5d\n", $seen{$_}, $_;

is the reverse of what you intended. $_ is a string, and $seen{$_} is the count of how many times $_ appears in the text (a number), so you want to say either

printf "%-20s %5d\n", $_, $seen{$_};

or

printf "%5d %-20s\n", $seen{$_}, $_;
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Ah, thanks. That did it. –  John Oct 10 '12 at 18:01
    
@John: If it has solved your problem then please consider to mark the answer as "Accepted". –  Chankey Pathak Oct 11 '12 at 4:12

Two things:

  1. You are reading the user entered file input into the variable $seen instead of $file.

  2. You need to chomp your the input that you receive to get rid of the trailing newlin:

    my $file= <>;
    chomp($file);
    

    or the short form:

    chomp(my $file = <>);
    
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Thanks, added the chomp but it didn't change the output –  John Oct 10 '12 at 16:35

In the second line you want to put the name of the file to open into $file, not $seen. So:

chomp(my $file = <>);

The chomp gets rid of the newline at the end (from pressing enter).

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Ah, thanks, Ive changed the script so many times I don't know whats what anymore. –  John Oct 10 '12 at 16:29

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