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Possible Duplicate:
Valid use of goto for error management in C?

Recently I've encountered C code like this:

if( !condition1){
    goto failure;
}

some_stuff_that_needs_manual_undoing();

if( !condition2){
    goto failure;
}

// And many more lines such as the ones above
return 0;

failure:
// Do a lot of stuff here, free, file closing and so on
return -1;

To sum up the situation:

I have a long function that do several things in a row (let's say open a file, then allocate memory based on file contents, then connect do database and so so on). Of course I want to free resources correctly, but there are lot of places which can cause function to end prematurely (and all of them need clean up).

The Question: How to do this correctly?

Although goto doesn't seem to be that bad practice it also doesn't seem to be good solution.

I though of following:

Use a macro which would do the job, e.g.:

#define CLEANUP if( memory != NULL)free(memory); \
                if( fp != NULL) fclose(fp);\
                // ...

if( !condition1){
    CLEANUP
    return -1;
}

if( !condition2){
    CLEANUP
    return -2;
}

// ...

This will result in duplicate assembly, but the cleanup code would be in one place.

Encapsulate function into another function

int _some_stuff_do_work(void **memory, FILE **file, ...){
    // Would just return on error
}

int some_stuff() {
    void *memory = NULL;
    FILE *file = NULL;

    _some_stuff_do_work( &memory, &file, ...);
    if( fp) fclose(fp);
}

This could get really ugly if there will be more than 3-5 things that will need cleaning up (the function would then take many arguments and that always calls for a problems).

OOP - Destructor

typedef struct {
    void *memory;
    FILE *fp;
} LOCAL_DATA;

// Destructor
void local_data_destroy( LOCAL_DATA *data)
{
    if( data->fp){
        free(data->fp);
        data->fp = NULL;
    }
}

But this could lead to many functions (and structures) that would be used only once in whole application and it seems like it could create a hell of a mass.

Loop and break statements

while(1){
    if( !condition1){
       break;
    }

    // ...

    break;
}

if( fp) fclose(fp);

I found this on may places but using one iteration loop? I don't know, it seems to be completely un-intuitive.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Bo Persson, interjay, Vlad Lazarenko, UmNyobe, Joe Oct 10 '12 at 23:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
There's another possibility: do{ /*...*/ }while(false); and break statements. – dyp Oct 10 '12 at 16:31
1  
Actually, I think that from these solutions, the original code with goto is the best. :) – Gabor Csardi Oct 10 '12 at 16:34
1  
Vyktor, there is no need to check for NULL before passing pointer to free. It guarantees to ignore NULL pointers. This wasn't true like 10 years ago, but now those checks don't make sense. – user405725 Oct 10 '12 at 16:35
    
@DyP thanks, though about this one, but forgot to put it down, added. – Vyktor Oct 10 '12 at 16:35
    
Cleaning up in a function and having a single exit point is one of the situations where a goto is perfect. This is still structured programming, not spaghetti code. – Zane Oct 10 '12 at 16:36
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Goto is the way to go. First understand why exactly "goto is bad" and then you will see that in situation you're describing goto is not really bad. Avoiding goto at all costs is just wrong and comes from shallow understanding of good programming principles.

This is way to go (Linux kernel source): http://goo.gl/uSgp5

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Gotos are awesome, actually. Gotos, gotos everywhere! – user405725 Oct 10 '12 at 16:50
1  
+1 for great source ;) goto = jmp, you can rewrite every language control construct in C into goto :) – Vyktor Oct 10 '12 at 16:52

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