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Looking through the ave function, I found a remarkable line:

split(x, g) <- lapply(split(x, g), FUN) # From ave

Interestingly, this line changes the value of x, which I found unexpected. I expected that split(x,g) would result in a list, which could be assigned to, but discarded afterward. My question is, why does the value of x change?

Another example may explain better:

a <- data.frame(id=c(1,1,2,2), value=c(4,5,7,6))
#   id value
# 1  1     4
# 2  1     5
# 3  2     7
# 4  2     6

split(a,a$id) # Split a row-wise by id into a list of size 2
# $`1`
#   id value
# 1  1     4
# 2  1     5
# $`2`
#   id value
# 3  2     7
# 4  2     6

# Find the row with highest value for each id
lapply(split(a,a$id),function(x) x[which.max(x$value),])
# $`1`
#   id value
# 2  1     5
# $`2`
#   id value
# 3  2     7

# Assigning to the split changes the data.frame a!
split(a,a$id)<-lapply(split(a,a$id),function(x) x[which.max(x$value),])
a
#   id value
# 1  1     5
# 2  1     5
# 3  2     7
# 4  2     7

Not only has a changed, but it changed to a value that does not look like the right hand side of the assignment! Even if assigning to split(a,a$id) somehow changes a (which I don't understand), why does it result in a data.frame instead of a list?

Note that I understand that there are better ways to accomplish this task. My question is why does split(a,a$id)<-lapply(split(a,a$id),function(x) x[which.max(x$value),]) change a?

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2  
The function you're calling is split<-, not split. They're two different functions. Look at split<-.default and it's obvious why a changes. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 10 '12 at 16:59
    
And you have to use backquotes to print the function because the function name contains an operator: `split<-.default`. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 10 '12 at 17:09
    
I this case, wouldn't the relevant function be `split<-.data.frame`? –  nograpes Oct 10 '12 at 17:16
    
Yes, it would but the function definitions are almost identical, so it doesn't really matter. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 10 '12 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The help page for split says in its header: "The replacement forms replace values corresponding to such a division." So it really should not be unexpected, although I admit it is not widely used. I do not understand how your example illustrates that the assigned values "do not look like the RHS of the assignment!". The max values are assigned to the 'value' lists within categories defined by the second argument factor.

(I do thank you for the question. I had not realized that split<- was at the core of ave. I guess it is more widely used than I realized, since I think ave is a wonderfully useful function.)

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I see. My issue was that I didn't realize that split<- was itself a function. I suspect that this function can be used for some very clever, concise, and efficient code. Thanks for your answer. –  nograpes Oct 10 '12 at 17:06
    
Type: methods(`split<-`) –  BondedDust Oct 10 '12 at 17:37

Just after definition of a, perform split(a, a$id)=1, the result would be:

> a
  id value
1  1     1
2  1     1
3  1     1
4  1     1
share|improve this answer
1  
split does not return results by reference. –  BondedDust Oct 10 '12 at 17:10
    
@DWin Thanks I corrected my answer –  Ali Oct 10 '12 at 17:14

The key here is that split<- actually modified the LHS with RHS values.

Here's an example:

> x <- c(1,2,3);
> split(x,x==2)
$`FALSE`
[1] 1 3
$`TRUE`
[1] 2
> split(x,x==2) <- split(c(10,20,30),c(10,20,30)==20)
> x
[1] 10 20 30

Note the line where I re-assign split(x,x==2) <- . This actually reassigns x.

As the comments below have stated, you can look up the definition of split<- like so

> `split<-.default`
function (x, f, drop = FALSE, ..., value) 
{
    ix <- split(seq_along(x), f, drop = drop, ...)
    n <- length(value)
    j <- 0
    for (i in ix) {
        j <- j%%n + 1
        x[i] <- value[[j]]
    }
    x
}
<bytecode: 0x1e18ef8>
<environment: namespace:base>
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2  
split<- is what's being called and it's written in R. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 10 '12 at 17:02
    
How would you display the code for that. At least for split, I can just type "split", and it outputs: function (x, f, drop = FALSE, ...) UseMethod("split") <bytecode: 0x1fd29f8> <environment: namespace:base> –  Arcymag Oct 10 '12 at 17:05
    
And to add to what Joshua says split (on the RHS) does return values, and does NOT pass by reference. –  BondedDust Oct 10 '12 at 17:06
    
You have to use backquotes because the function name contains an operator. `split<-.default` –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 10 '12 at 17:08
2  
@DWin: escape them with a backslash. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 10 '12 at 17:10

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