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The following sample plugin adds the custom mod rewrite rules to .htaccess when the user changes the permalink settings.

/* Plugin Name: Sample Mod Rewrite  */

add_action('generate_rewrite_rules', array(new custom_mod_rewrite, "generate_rewrite_rules"));

class custom_mod_rewrite {
    function __construct() {
        $this->wp_rewrite = & $GLOBALS["wp_rewrite"];
    }
    function generate_rewrite_rules() {

        $non_wp_rules = array(
            'simple-redirect/?$plugin_name' => 'http://google.com',
            'one-more-redirect/?$plugin_name' => 'http://yahoo.com'
        );

        $this->wp_rewrite->non_wp_rules = $non_wp_rules + $this->wp_rewrite->non_wp_rules;
        add_filter('mod_rewrite_rules', array(&$this, "mod_rewrite_rules"));
    }
    function mod_rewrite_rules($rules) {
        return preg_replace('#^(RewriteRule \^.*/)\?\$plugin_name .*(http://.*) \[QSA,L\]#mi', '$1 $2 [R=301,L]', $rules);
    }
}

There are two problems I found with this.

  1. If it is set to the default permalink, it won't add the rules.
  2. More importantly, unless the user changes the permalink settings, the rules won't be added. (can be solved with $wp_rewrite->flush_rules() performed at the plugin activation)

For #2, I'm wondering if there is a good way to add the rules programmatically.

IIS (common on Windows servers) does not support mod_rewrite.

source: http://codex.wordpress.org/Using_Permalinks#Permalinks_without_mod_rewrite

It sounds like not all systems use .htaccess. So directly editing the .htaccess file may not be the best choice for a distributed plugin. I don't know. Probably I have to check if the server uses Apache and if so I need to check whether .htacess is writable and existing rules do not have the adding rules, then at last I can append the rules to it. Also when the user deactivate the plugin, the rules have to be erased. So it's kind of troublesome.

If WordPress can handle it with a built-in API or something, I'd like to leave it to WordPress. But the above example was what I could have found so far. So I appreciate your information.

Update

As pfefferle suggested, I could use $wp_rewrite->flush_rules(). However, the problem #1 still persists; it won't take any effect when the default permalink settings is used. Any ideas?

/* Plugin Name: Sample Mod Rewrite  */

$custom_mod_rewrite = new custom_mod_rewrite;
register_activation_hook( __FILE__, array($custom_mod_rewrite, 'flush_rewrite_rules'));
register_deactivation_hook( __FILE__, array($custom_mod_rewrite, 'flush_rewrite_rules'));
add_action('generate_rewrite_rules', array($custom_mod_rewrite, "generate_rewrite_rules"));

class custom_mod_rewrite {
    function __construct() {
        $this->wp_rewrite = & $GLOBALS["wp_rewrite"];
    }
    function flush_rewrite_rules() {
        $this->wp_rewrite->flush_rules();
    }
    function generate_rewrite_rules() {

        $non_wp_rules = array(
            'simple-redirect/?$plugin_name' => 'http://google.com',
            'one-more-redirect/?$plugin_name' => 'http://yahoo.com'
        );

        $this->wp_rewrite->non_wp_rules = $non_wp_rules + $this->wp_rewrite->non_wp_rules;
        add_filter('mod_rewrite_rules', array(&$this, "mod_rewrite_rules"));
    }
    function mod_rewrite_rules($rules) {
        return preg_replace('#^(RewriteRule \^.*/)\?\$plugin_name .*(http://.*) \[QSA,L\]#mi', '$1 $2 [R=301,L]', $rules);
    }
}

Also, when deactivating the plugin, it doesn't change back to the previous rules. I just followed the codex example and just set it to flush the rules when deactivating the plugin. So there should be some code to delete the added rules.

As a side note, according to the codex,

Flushing the rewrite rules is an expensive operation, ... ... you should flush rewrite rules on the activation hook of a plugin, or when you know that the rewrite rules need to be changed

Remaining Issues:

  1. If it is set to the default permalink, it won't add the rules.
  2. When deactivating the plugin, it doesn't change back to the previous rules.
share|improve this question
    
Please see as well a currently active, very similiar question: How can I rewrite a wordpress URL to use the first sub directory as a querystring? - maybe you can help each other or at least exchange opinions. –  hakre Oct 13 '12 at 0:59
    
@hakre It seems I cannot understand the question asked there. I could not reproduce the OP's problem by trying the posted code. Nothing happens. So I'd rather not bother the OP by asking a way to reproduce the problem. –  Teno Oct 13 '12 at 13:17
1  
mini-answer: If you use the default (?p=) permalinks, WordPress operates without any mod_rewrite URL rewriting at all. That is why this doesn't work when you switch to the default permalinks. –  s_ha_dum Oct 15 '12 at 21:44
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3 Answers

You have to "flush" the rewrite rules after you add some changes: http://codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/flush_rewrite_rules

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I updated the question. The problem #1 still persists. –  Teno Oct 11 '12 at 12:26
    
you have to flush it after you add the changes. what you now do is on_activation and on_deactivation that means: you flush the rules, wordpress re-generates them and then you change them. –  pfefferle Oct 11 '12 at 13:34
    
try this one add_action('generate_rewrite_rules', array(&$custom_mod_rewrite, 'flush_rewrite_rules')); –  pfefferle Oct 11 '12 at 13:39
1  
I commented out the lines of activation & deactivation hooks and inserted the line after add_action('generate_rewrite_rules', array($custom_mod_rewrite, "generate_rewrite_rules")); Now it produces the error, Fatal error: Maximum function nesting level of '100' reached, aborting! –  Teno Oct 11 '12 at 15:05
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You can use symfony's routing system like described here: http://pookey.co.uk/wordpress/archives/80-playing-with-symfony-routing-without-symfony

You can write a simple plugin to implement the ideea.

EDIT: there is already a plugin that edits .htaccess. http://plugins.svn.wordpress.org/wp-htaccess-editor/trunk/ Use it as an example.

NOTICE: Editing directly .htaccess means apache user has write access to the file and this can be dangerous. But i suppose you already know that. ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. The example is using .htaccess so I suppose it would require editing it. The question is how we can edit it in a plugin though. Thanks for your input. –  Teno Oct 18 '12 at 22:22
    
i added to the response a link to help. –  Udan Oct 18 '12 at 23:04
    
By looking at the plugin, WP Htaccess Editor, you introduced, it lets users type their rules. I rather hoped a way to do it programmatically, not by hand. So a simplified code example would be nice which checks if the user uses Apache and the access right and adds the rules to .htaccess and remove the rules upon the plugin deactivation. –  Teno Oct 19 '12 at 8:03
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, there seems to be no effective solution for it at the moment.

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