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Earlier today (actually yesterday due to my time-zone) I was attempting a programming interview using Visual Studio 2012 for C++ on Interview Street (which uses g++).

To be brief, I came across several compilation errors1 when I was using

#include <cstring>

which was provided by the skeleton code in one of the question, and after turning to

#include <string>

all compilation errors magically disappeared.

However, upon submission to Interview Street, I had to add c back; otherwise I got compilation errors.

It was the first time I was bitten by non-standardization....

My question is: what inside <string> and <cstring> took me (precious) more than half an hour?


1 For anyone who is curious:

One error by Visual Studio 2012 if using <cstring> is:

error C2338: The C++ Standard doesn't provide a hash for this type.

in

c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\xstddef

possibly for string as key in unordered_map

One error by g++ if using <string> is:

'strlen' was not declared in this scope

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The cstring header provides functions for dealing with C-style strings — null-terminated arrays of characters. This includes functions like strlen and strcpy. It's the C++ version of the classic string.h header from C.

The string header provides the std::string class and related functions and operators.

The headers have similar names, but they're not really related beyond that. They cover separate tasks.

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The puzzle is: g++ does not seem to need <string> for string, whereas Visual Studio does not seem to need <cstring> for c stuff. Why? –  Dante is not a Geek Oct 10 '12 at 17:08
4  
The C++ standard allows standard headers to include other standard headers, so you could get the contents of string from any of the other headers you've already included, such as iostream. Likewise for cstring. Always include all the headers you need. Don't rely on your specific environment to implicitly include some of them for you; you'll run into problems if you need your code to be portable, or if you change compiler versions and the new version has different implicit header dependencies. –  Rob Kennedy Oct 10 '12 at 17:09
4  
@DanteisnotaGeek: Implementations are allowed to include other headers in their headers. Most probably VS adds #include <cstring> in some of the other headers you include, and gcc adds #include <string> in some header you included. You should include both since your code depends on both headers. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 10 '12 at 17:12

In C++, you wouldn't use #include <somefile.h>, but instead #include <somefile>. Now C++ has its string classes in <string>, but the c-string functions are also available, which would be in <string.h>. C++ uses for 'traditional' c- include files. Therefore, <cstring> and <string>

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/

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The puzzle is: g++ does not seem to need <string> for string, whereas Visual Studio does not seem to need <cstring> for c stuff. Why? –  Dante is not a Geek Oct 10 '12 at 17:09
1  
@DanteisnotaGeek good question. MSVC always was a bit strange. –  Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 10 '12 at 17:13

<cstring> has the C string code from the C header string.h. C++ has a convention where C headers have the same base name, except for a leading c and no trailing .h. All the contents are available under the std:: namespace.

<string> has the standard library std::string and related functions

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1  
The puzzle is: g++ does not seem to need <string> for string, whereas Visual Studio does not seem to need <cstring> for c stuff. Why? –  Dante is not a Geek Oct 10 '12 at 17:08
    
@DanteisnotaGeek then <string> must be included in a different header. You should always include <string> if you need it. I don't think there is any standard header that is guaranteed to include it. –  juanchopanza Oct 10 '12 at 17:11

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