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Since I'm new to Python, I need some advice from experienced people. What is the best way to run a Python method from time A to time B every T minutes using only core Python libraries?

To be more specific:

I need single threaded app which will start monitor timestamps of pair of files to make sure that the difference in file creation is always greater than 0. I need to run this monitor only from 9 to 6 every 2 minutes. I will take a look at schedule and time library...

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I'm not sure I totally understand where time B comes in. Is time B when the method, which has started at time A, ends normally? Or do you wish to stop the method at time B whether or not it is done doing its work? –  zigg Oct 10 '12 at 17:11
2  
You should have a look at the time and threading modules –  John Vinyard Oct 10 '12 at 17:12
    
What type of application are you creating? Single-threaded or multi-threading? In any case, you can take a look at the sched module. –  Thanos Makris Oct 10 '12 at 17:18
2  
what have you tried? / what is the intended goal or use? / be less generic and a bit more specific. –  Inbar Rose Oct 10 '12 at 17:24

4 Answers 4

You could:

  1. Use cron (on *nix) or Windows task scheduler to run your script at a desired time.

    It will make your solution both simpler and more robust.

    Or

  2. Run your script as a daemon and subscribe to file system events to monitor your files.

    You could use pyinotify and the like depending on your OS. It provides the best reaction to changes time

Solutions based on time, threading, sched modules are more complex, harder to implement and less reliable.

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At first thought something like this might work for you:

import time

# run every T minutes
T = 1
# run process for t seconds
t = 1.

while True:
    start = time.time()

    while time.time() < (start + t):
        print 'hello world'

    print 'sleeping'
    # convert minutes to seconds and subtract the about of time the process ran
    time.sleep(T*60-t)

But there might be a better way, knowing exactly what you're trying to accomplish

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Hi, thank you for the sample, to be more specific, I need single threaded app which will start monitor timestamps of pair of files to make sure that the difference in file creation is always greater then 0. I need to run this monitor only from 9 to 6 every 2 minutes. I will take a look at schedule and time library... –  ilyaw77 Oct 10 '12 at 18:16
    
@ilyaw77: you could edit your question so this info would be more visible to others –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 10 '12 at 18:36
    
thanks, I will now... –  ilyaw77 Oct 10 '12 at 18:38
import time

#... initislize  A, B and T here

time.sllep(max(0, A - time.time()) # wait for the A moment

while time.time() < B:
    call_your_method()
    time.sleep(T)
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Is this what you are after?

import time
from datetime import datetime

def doSomething(t,a,b):
    while True:
        if a > b:
            print 'The end date is less than the start date.  Exiting.'
            break
        elif datetime.now() < a:
            # Date format: %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S
            now = datetime.now()
            wait_time = time.mktime(time.strptime(str(a),"%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"))-\
                        time.mktime(time.strptime(str(now), "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f"))
            print 'The start date is',wait_time,'seconds from now.  Waiting'
            time.sleep(wait_time)
        elif datetime.now() > b:
            print 'The end date has passed.  Exiting.'
            break
        else:
            # do something, in this example I am printing the local time
            print time.localtime()
            seconds = t*60  # convert minutes to seconds
            time.sleep(seconds) # wait this number of seconds

# date time format is year, month, day, hour, minute, and second
start_date = datetime(2012, 10, 10, 14, 38, 00)
end_date = datetime(2012, 10, 10, 14, 39, 00)
# do something every 2 minutes from the start to end dates
doSomething(2,start_date,end_date)

It will wait until the start date and run the function until the end date. There probably could be some additional error checking depending on what you are doing. Right now all it does is check for invalid entries such as a start date that is greater than an end date. All you have to do is specify the date and times. Hope this helps.

Edit: Ah, I see you updated your question with additional requirements. This method probably won't work for you then.

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Nater,thanks for the answer anyway, for a newbie like me it gives a good example how to think in Python :) –  ilyaw77 Oct 10 '12 at 19:10

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