Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

A periodic sequence is a sequence that repeats itself after n terms, for example, the following is a periodic sequence:

1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, ...

And we define the period of that sequence to be the number of terms in each subsequence (the subsequence above is 1, 2, 3). So the period for the above sequence is 3.

In R, I can define the above sequence (albeit not to infinity), using:

sequence <- rep(c(1,2,3),n) #n is a predefined variable

So if n = 50, sequence will be the sequence 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, ... , 1, 2, 3, where each number has appeared 50 times, in the obvious way.

I am looking to build a function that calculates the periodicity of sequence. Pseudocode is as follows:

period <- function(sequence){
    subsequence <- subsequence(sequence) #identify the subsequence
    len.subsequence <- length(subsequence) #calculate its length
    return(len.subsequence) #return it
}

How would I identify the subsequence? This is sort of a reversing of the rep function, such that I pass in a sequence and it passes out the length of the initial vector.

share|improve this question
1  
I occurs to me that things can get hairy if there are repeated subsequences, e.g. 1,2,3,1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,1,2,3,4,5 . As DWIN and mdrwab pointed out, nonmonotonic sequences may yield "diff = 0" results erroneously. Maybe you should just take the Fourier transform and look for peaks :-) – Carl Witthoft Oct 10 '12 at 19:48
    
@dplanet, how did any of the answers below work out for you? If they didn't, can you indicate what further you might be looking for? – A Handcart And Mohair Feb 10 '13 at 15:20
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the period is always the same, i.e. the sequence never changes, then you could use a loop over lag to see when a match occurs.

With total bias, I would also recommend using seqle (guess who wrote that function :-) ), which is like rle but finds sequences. detect intervals of the consequent integer sequences I'm not the only person to edit the source for "rle" that way.

share|improve this answer

It's fairly easy with that sequence, although I would avoid using the name 'sequence' since it is an R function name. This would identify the periodicity of any monotonic sequence so it's a bit more general but it would not identify a sequence like: 1.2.3.4.2.3.4,1,2,3,4,2,3,4, ....

> which(diff(seQ) < 0)
[1]  3  6  9 12 15 18 21 24 27
> diff(which(diff(seQ) < 0) )
[1] 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

You could test the equality of intervals or use either of those results to index the original vector. You should test your answers with c(1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 3, 4) to see if they pass the test of identifying an non-monotonic repetition. So far none of them do so; since none report a period of 7.

share|improve this answer
    
I've taken a stab at trying to identify non-monotonic repetition, but I'm not really comfortable (no prior experience) with using while(). Any suggestions? – A Handcart And Mohair Oct 10 '12 at 19:22

Building on the lead from @DWin, you can probably make a function something like this:

subsequence <- function(data) {
  ii <- 0
  while (TRUE) {
    ii <- ii + 1
    LAG <- sum((diff(data, lag = ii) == 0) - 1)
    if (LAG == 0) { break }
  }
  list(Period = ii, 
       Sequence = data[1:ii], 
       Reps = length(data)/ii) 
}

Note: This was my first time using while(), so I'm not sure if there's a better way to implement it.

Here is some data; s3 is non-monotonic:

s1 <- rep(c(1,2,3), 3)
s2 <- rep(c(1,2,3), 50)
s3 <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 3, 4)

Here are the results of the subsequence() function.

subsequence(s1)
# $Period
# [1] 3
# 
# $Sequence
# [1] 1 2 3
# 
# $Reps
# [1] 3

subsequence(s2)
# $Period
# [1] 3
# 
# $Sequence
# [1] 1 2 3
# 
# $Reps
# [1] 50

subsequence(s3)
# $Period
# [1] 7
# 
# $Sequence
# [1] 1 2 3 4 2 3 4
# 
# $Reps
# [1] 2
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.