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unsigned int    error_bits =       

                 ( X && Y )
                 | ( A == TRUE)                         << 1
                 | ( B == TRUE)                         << 2
                 | ( C == TRUE && 
                     D == TRUE)                         << 4;

I believe the general concept here is to set each of the 32 bits to true or false based on certain conditions - with each bit representing an error of something.

With the syntax above, I'm a little confused as to what is being set, shifted and where/why.

Any clarification is helpful.

Thank You.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are right. The layout of the bits after the line are:

Bits X-5: 0
Bit 4: (C == TRUE && D == TRUE)
Bit 3: 0
Bit 2: B == TRUE
Bit 1: A == TRUE
Bit 0: (X && Y)

From most significant to least significant bit. Propably something like this would be more readable (a matter of taste):

unsigned int error_bits = 0;

if( X && Y )     
    error_bits |= 1;

if( A == TRUE )     
    error_bits |= 2;

if( B == TRUE )     
    error_bits |= 4;

if( C == TRUE && D == TRUE )     
    error_bits |= 16;
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A == TRUE will evaluate to 1 if A is TRUE. 1 << 1 is 2, or an integer with only the 2nd bit set (numbered from least-significant). 1 << 4 is 16, or an integer with only the 5th bit set.

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craig65535: thank you...... –  T.T.T. Oct 10 '12 at 17:52

error_bits value is set according to:

  • Least significant bit (b0) is set when (X && Y) is true , i.e., both X and Y are true.
  • b1 is set when A is true
  • b2 is set when B is true
  • b3 is clear
  • b4 is set when both C and D are true
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thank you........ –  T.T.T. Oct 10 '12 at 17:51

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