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I have a String variable containing text file (such as .html) using fopen() and next im going to strip_tags() so that i can use that untaged text for an article preview, but before that, I need to get h1 nodeValue, and as well count characters of it, so i can replace the zero in the code below with that value, and end with 150+ that value.

$f = fopen($filepath,"r");
$WholeFile = fread($f, filesize($filepath));
fclose($f);
$StrippedFile=strip_tags($WholeFile);
$TextExtract = mb_substr("$StrippedFile", 0,150);

What is the best way for me to go? Is a parser the answer? Since this is only situation [so far] I will be extracting values from html tags

share|improve this question
1  
As an aside, "$StrippedFile" should be $StrippedFile. Quoting it is unnecessary for the case of a single variable. –  Jason McCreary Oct 10 '12 at 17:36
    
This is a bad idea. You will end up with lots of navigation links for the article preview. I would use the DOM extension to fetch the first <p> tag content and check to see if it's long enough for a good article preview, if not try the next. –  Xeoncross Oct 10 '12 at 18:29
    
Im going to create a <div> object , which will be combination of first line title (former h1) and second line (or more-stylesheet not done yet) first 150 characters from the content.And as well a floating thumbnail.The entire <div> will be a single link to the article. i want to get those values into variables for MySQL work. –  Slytherin Oct 10 '12 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you are certain of the content of the file you are processing, and know that the title is in H1, you could potentially slice the string you are getting at the </h1> location (using strstr() for example although there are a plethora of ways to do that), into two strings.

You can then strip tags on the first one to get the title and strip tags on the second one to get the content. This is assuming your file ONLY has a single h1 containing the title, before the dom element that contains the content of the article.

Keep in mind this is not the best way to parse a wide range of articles online, for a more general solution I'd look into a dedicated parser class.

Here is a code sample :

Code sample

$f = fopen($filepath,"r");
$WholeFile = fread($f, filesize($filepath));
fclose($f);
// Modified part
$content = strip_tags(strstr($WholeFile, '</h1>'));
$title = strip_tags(strstr($WholeFile, '</h1>', true)); // Valid with PHP 5.3.0 only I think
$TextExtract = mb_substr($content, 0,150);
share|improve this answer
    
many thanks , i will look into that , and post the resulting code i will come up with.or ask more newbie questions. –  Slytherin Oct 10 '12 at 17:51
    
I just added a code sample that should be relatively quick to try for your use case. –  joual Oct 10 '12 at 18:27
    
Many thanks again , i am very noobish in php , and i didnt even think of function(function)) so i went around creating "StepVariables" using single functions on those...im ashamed now. –  Slytherin Oct 10 '12 at 18:42
    
Using this works for me now , but i made a little alteration, i inserted another strstr within the strstr($Whole...true), in case any article may begin with pre-speech before the title h1, because in that case resulting string would contain that as well. –  Slytherin Oct 10 '12 at 19:06

When you have structured text (like HTML, XML, json, YAML, whatever), you should always use a proper parser unless you have a very good reason not to.

You might be able to get away with regexes in this situation, but you will have a very brittle solution and are likely to have problems related to character encoding, entities, or whitespace. All the solutions above will break subtly. For example, if you have input like this:

<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" />
<title>Page title</title></head>
<body><div><h1 title="attributes or the space in the closing tag may confuse code"
>Title &mdash;    maybe emdash counted as 7 characters</h1 >
<p> and      whitespace counted excessively too. And here's
a utf-8 character that may get split in the middle: ©; creating  
an invalid string.</p></div></body></html>

Here is a solution using DOMDocument and DOMXPath which should work on all but the worst HTML, and will always give you a 150 character (not byte, character) utf-8 reply with all entities normalized down to their character value.

$html = '<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" />
<title>Page title</title></head>
<body><div><h1 title="attributes or the space in the closing tag may confuse code"
>Title &mdash;    maybe emdash counted as 7 characters</h1 >
<p> and      whitespace counted excessively too. And here\'s
a utf-8 character that may get split in the middle: ©; creating  
an invalid string.</p></div></body></html>';


$doc = new DOMDocument();
$doc->loadHTML($html);
// if you have a url or filename, you can use this instead:
// $doc->loadHTMLFile($url);
$xp = new DOMXPath($doc);

// you can easily modify the xquery to match the "title" of different documents
$titlenode = $xp->query('/html/body//h1[1]');

$xpath = 'normalize-space(substring(
        concat(
            normalize-space(.),
            " ",
            normalize-space(./following-sibling::*)
        ), 0, 150))';


$excerpt = null;
if ($titlenode->length) {
    $excerpt = $xp->evaluate($xpath, $titlenode->item(0));
}

var_export($excerpt);

This code will output:

'Title — maybe emdash counted as 7 characters and whitespace counted excessively too. And here\'s a utf-8 character that may get split in the middle: ©'

The basic idea here is to match your h1 (or whatever title element) with XPath, then get the string value of that element and all following elements and truncate by 150 characters, also using XPath. Keeping everything in XPath avoids all the messy charset and entity issues you would have to handle with PHP instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that , but so far , i am very new to php , and i am learning multiple languages as it is ( may seem just lazy , i know ) so any other syntactic may cause me a spontaneous combustion.Besides , my testing files containing utf-8 characters , such as ěščžý,runnig script above , returned indeed 150 of those characters.Since it isnt even conflicting with my MySQL , i am settling with that for now. (Limited time to finish project) –  Slytherin Oct 10 '12 at 19:11
    
To mention the recent edit of Your post , it seems im already handling the charset issue.My first ( and for the project the only ) language sort of requires that. –  Slytherin Oct 10 '12 at 19:14
    
If you are using normal PHP functions like substr, your scripts will corrupt strings eventually. See here for more information on the PHP unicode mess. Learning a little bit of DOM and XPath pales in comparison to the problems you'll face in PHP and the gotchas you need to memorize. –  Francis Avila Oct 10 '12 at 19:21
    
that difficulty i already came across , therefor im using unicode friendly mb_substr.Although i take Your point and im putting DOM on my to-do list. For the moment it seems pretty overwhelming,since i didnt master css and javascript either. –  Slytherin Oct 10 '12 at 19:46
    
This is a very clean way to do the job, this is definitely the answer you were looking for. –  Alain Tiemblo Oct 11 '12 at 7:47

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