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I'm looking for some guidance when designing a windows 8 store, turn-by-turn game application (XAML / C#).

Each turn, the AI does some tasks, and the player does some tasks. This can be treated as a state-machine/fixed workflow.

I can think of using a game loop [1] or creating and tracking each state in a state machine triggered by user input[2]:

[1]:
where(true)
{
    BeginTurn();
    AiDoSomething1();
    await PlayerInput1();

    AiDoSomething2();
    await PlayerInput2();
    EndTurn();
}

[2]:
void PlayerInput1()
{
    lock(_lock)
    {
        if(State == State.State1)
        {
            State = State.State2;
            AiDoSomething2();
        }
    }
}

void PlayerInput2()
{
    lock(_lock)
    {
        if(State == State.State2)
        {
           State = State.State1;
           EndTurn(); BeginTurn();
           AiDoSomething1();
        }
    }
}

For windows 8 store apps using XAML/C#, is there a well known pattern to tackle this sort of scenario?

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1  
What kind of problem are you encountering? You can just stick that kind of logic in your VM and have no problems. –  mydogisbox Oct 10 '12 at 17:57
    
first time doing this, so just trying to see if there are known patterns for this problem. [2] is straightforward but the workflow is dispersed through the various user input functions. That doesn't look right. [1] waits for user input, so does that mean i need to bind the user input (say, button click) to a function which fires an event which my (await PlayerInput1) is waiting for? –  jws_ Oct 10 '12 at 18:18
    
Use a VisualStateManager:msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/… –  mydogisbox Oct 10 '12 at 18:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can control your visual states using a VisualStateManager. Using this you only have to set one value in your VM and then react to view states in your view.

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ill try this, thanks –  jws_ Oct 12 '12 at 8:18

Not sure whether you mean game loop in the more literal sense but just in case someone searches for that here are three ways you can create a game loop in Windows 8:

  1. Use XNA/MonoGame and be done with it. Requires taking on a big external dependency
  2. Use CompositionTarget.Rendering. Easy, but no way to know how much time elapsed between frames
  3. Use MonoGame's GameTimer. Uses the last method behind the scenes and a Stopwatch to track elapsed time. Likely your best bet if you're not using XNA

More details can be found http://www.spottedzebrasoftware.com/blog/windows-8-game-loop.html

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