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It seems with HTML5/CSS3, there is a larger push towards CSS-only animations, effects, navigations, etc.

Is this purely because of the tendency of C/Java/etc developers to use JavaScript 'incorrectly' (mostly in a semantic sense, I guess)?

Or is there an advantage of CSS over JavaScript? If so, why would CSS be better? Is it faster?

Also, semantically-speaking, shouldn't CSS only be used for styling/positioning? So is CSS starting to go outside the bounds of what it was designed for?

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closed as not constructive by Wesley Murch, David Thomas, Ayman Safadi, Michael Mullany, Graviton Oct 11 '12 at 3:12

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There is a larger push towards CSS-only animations purely because of the tendency of C/Java/etc developers to use JavaScript 'incorrectly'. <-- Doesn't that sound ridiculous? –  Wesley Murch Oct 10 '12 at 18:03
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Javascript has been used "incorrectly" (or even plain incorrectly) by a lot of people pretty much as long as it has existed, that has hardly been a reason for anything at all to happen. –  Guffa Oct 10 '12 at 18:10
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CSS animations and filters are supposed to be and often are GPU-accelerated. So, yes, they are faster than their emulation in JavaScript. –  katspaugh Oct 10 '12 at 18:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Is this purely because of the tendency of C/Java/etc developers to use JavaScript 'incorrectly' (mostly in a semantic sense, I guess)?

No, you've just about missed the point by a mile. The main reason people use JavaScript is because they want to support as many browsers as possible. CSS3 is a new technology, which only the latest and greatest browsers understand, whereas JavaScript has been around for decades.

Or is there an advantage of CSS over JavaScript? If so, why would CSS be better? Is it faster?

Yes, because the browser knows best how to make use of system resources to perform animations, and it can do that job best when implementing them natively using CSS (e.g. hardware acceleration). With JavaScript, you're relying on a browser's scripting engine to calculate animations for you, which can get very expensive.

But as mentioned above, the greatest drawback is lackluster support.

Also, semantically-speaking, shouldn't CSS only be used for styling/positioning? So is CSS starting to go outside the bounds of what it was designed for?

Broadly speaking, it has always been meant for presentation — separating that as a concern from content and structure, when HTML was riddled with presentational attributes munged all over the place, spelling development hell for any frontend developer of their time.

All these fancy effects you describe can easily be categorized under presentation (i.e. they don't have anything to do with application logic, business logic, content, data, etc), so it would seem apt that they should be done with CSS. And that brings us where we are today.

So, to summarize:

  • JavaScript is used when browser support is a foremost priority (and in business applications it almost always is). It is also often maintained as is if it's too costly to convert or migrate to another technology.

  • Otherwise, CSS is used. Of course, a JavaScript fallback is often provided. You'll often see this in experiments or new/startup projects.

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This answered everything! Thanks! –  PRNDL Development Studios Oct 10 '12 at 18:20

I can't see a VS here. Actually I think a great web app should be made mixing both of them!

I like to think about JavaScript for user interactions and CSS for design. That's how I decide which one I should use for a specific purpose.

Now days you have a lot of great works from brilliant people in order to solve the compatibility issues. E.g.: http://modernizr.com/

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One major issue is that not everyone's browser has Javascript enabled. So if you can achieve the same effects with HTML5/CSS3 it has the advantage that it will work on all modern browsers regardless of whether or not they have Javascript enabled.

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An even bigger issue is that not all browser support CSS3. People who do not have JS enabled account for <2% of all internet traffic. People using browsers <=IE8 is MUCH higher. –  mburn7 Oct 10 '12 at 18:04
    
That is guaranteed to happen in the future. People who have Javascript disabled are doing so for security reasons, and will never enable it. And CSS3 support is pretty far along on all of them. –  thatidiotguy Oct 10 '12 at 18:04
    
Expect to see websites start treating those people like they treat <IE7 users. (ie: they'll stop caring about them) To much time is spent trying to cater to an ever shrinking percentage of users who live in some archaic reasoning that they are safer with javascript disabled (and yet most still have Flash installed). –  mburn7 Oct 10 '12 at 18:09

Yes, css is faster than javascript. In addition, javascript require additional http request, while you can avoid that if you'll use only css.

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Javascript doesn't require additional requests more than CSS does. Both can be either in inline tags or in separate files. –  Guffa Oct 10 '12 at 18:06
    
I didn't say that. If you use css and javascript, both loaded externally, and the javascript part can be done with css only - you can save that file load (http request). –  Alvarez Oct 10 '12 at 19:14
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I see what you mean, but by the same reasoning CSS requires an additional request. If you can do the same with Javascript only, you don't need to load the CSS. –  Guffa Oct 10 '12 at 19:17
    
Yep, but have you seen any site that doesn't use css these days? I don't think so. In the other hand, I saw a lot of sites that doesn't use javascript. –  Alvarez Oct 10 '12 at 22:24
    
wow! when did you see those lots of sites that doesn't use javascript? 1980? –  Gilberto Ramos Nov 4 '13 at 18:21

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