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I am trying to sort a large (10mb) file on the first 2 columns. The file is delimited by ASCII 241 (±). The problem is that after sorting the first 2 data fields correctly, unix keeps sorting on the rest of the line, regardless of the inclusion of the -s option.

Command : sort -k1bn -k2n -s -t$'\xF1' -o sorted_file file_to_sort

Sample data: (fairly sorted, so I can highlight the issue)

   6033718±2±    0±20817742
   6033718±3±20817742      
   6033718±3±20862761      
   6033718±3±SRDV408BC     
   6033718±3±KFT474        
   6033718±3±941764        
   6033718±4±20817742      
   6033718±4±20862761      
   6033718±4±SRDV408BC     
   6033718±4±KFT474        
   6033718±4±941764        
   6033718±5±21501-0-06   ±D13 * TIMING
   6033718±5±17003-0-01   ±VEHICLE OPER
   6033718±6±21501-0-06   ±10  ±0±     
   6033718±6±17003-0-01   ±10  ±0±     
   6033718±9±I± === Applicable Coverage
   6033718±9±I±Volvo D11/13/16 / TIMING
   6033718±9±E±check for oil leak, insp

After running the command, I get:

   6033718±2±    0±20817742            
   6033718±3±20817742                  
   6033718±3±20862761                  
   6033718±3±941764                    
   6033718±3±KFT474                    
   6033718±3±SRDV408BC                 
   6033718±4±20817742                  
   6033718±4±20862761                  
   6033718±4±941764                    
   6033718±4±KFT474                    
   6033718±4±SRDV408BC                 
   6033718±5±17003-0-01   ±VEHICLE OPER
   6033718±5±21501-0-06   ±D13 * TIMING
   6033718±6±17003-0-01   ±10  ±0±     
   6033718±6±21501-0-06   ±10  ±0±     
   6033718±9±E±check for oil leak, insp
   6033718±9±I± === Applicable Coverage
   6033718±9±I±Volvo D11/13/16 / TIMING

As you can see, looking at the '3', '4' & '9' records, they data following the second field has been sorted, even though the manual for sort states that the -s option will prevent sorting of the rest of the line after the keys have been exhausted.

Where am I going wrong here?

BTW, it seems to work fine on a smaller file.

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closed as off topic by Raymond Chen, cadrell0, Adrian Faciu, sinelaw, rckoenes Oct 16 '12 at 13:56

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2  
There is no ASCII 241 character; ASCII is a 7-bit character set. There are several ways the ± could be represented. In UTF-8, it's two bytes; in Latin-1, it's one byte. I don't know if that's relevant, but try changing all the ± characters to, say, @ and see if you get the same behavior. If not, it might be a locale issue; sort might be seeing the ± character differently. –  Keith Thompson Oct 10 '12 at 18:27
    
What's the output of sort --version? I see "sort (GNU coreutils) 5.93" –  Seamus Abshere Oct 10 '12 at 18:29
    
is it just a coincidence, or is the problem that the last column for the 3,4,9 records are sorting lexigraphically and not numerically? i.e. +3+20862761, followed by +3+941764. I would have expected the opposite order. Good luck. –  shellter Oct 10 '12 at 18:34
    
Version is "sort (GNU coreutils) 5.97" –  user1735737 Oct 10 '12 at 18:44
    
The problem is that they shouldn't be sorted at all..... –  user1735737 Oct 10 '12 at 18:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The sorting keys are specified as -k <start>[,<end>]. If <end> is not specified, the key used is from <start> to the end of the line, which is somewhat unintuitive. You probably want something more like this:

sort -k1,1bn -k2,2n -s -t$'\xF1' -o sorted_file file_to_sort

Note these keys specify single fields, rather than the default of "all fields starting at ... until the end of the line".

share|improve this answer
    
If I use your command, the entire file remains UNSORTED. As soon as I pull the -s out, the file sorts, albeit still performing the 'rest of line' sorting, after the 2 keys. I don't think it is seeing those keys correctly, and is just performing a 'whole-line' sort.... –  user1735737 Oct 10 '12 at 19:00
    
Hmmm... I wonder if the -t needs to be before the -k options... I wouldn't think so, but... –  twalberg Oct 10 '12 at 19:12
    
I was right - a plain sort command - sort -o sorted_file file_to_sort - produces the same results as the line without the -s. It is not seeing those keys...... Oh and tried putting the -t first, no change. –  user1735737 Oct 10 '12 at 19:24
    
Maybe it's a locale issue - in latin1, the character you're using for a separator is decimal 177 ($'\xb1'), not 241 ($'\xf1'1). Not sure what your locale settings are... If you echo $'\xf1'`, do you get the expected character back? –  twalberg Oct 10 '12 at 19:26
    
You were right - the locale IS Latin-1. Unfortunately, changing the xF1 to xB1 had no effect . As soon as that -s goes in, no sort... Could it be the size of the file? If I use the new command 'sort -t$'\xB1' -k1,1bn -k2,2n -s -o sorted_file file_to_sort' on the little snippet of data posted here, it works beautifully, just like I want it to.... –  user1735737 Oct 10 '12 at 21:54

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