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I need to process a large text file (600 MB approximately) in order to format it correctly, writing the formatted output to a new text file. The problem is that writing the content into the new file stops at about 6.2 MB. Here is the code:

/* Analysis of the text in fileName to see if the lines are in the correct format 
     * (Theme\tDate\tTitle\tDescription). If there are lines that are in the incorrect format,
     * the method corrects them.
     */
    public static void cleanTextFile(String fileName, String destFile) throws IOException {
        OutputStreamWriter writer = null;
        BufferedReader reader = null;

        try {
            writer = new OutputStreamWriter(new FileOutputStream(destFile), "UTF8");
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Could not open or create the file " + destFile);
        }

        try {
            reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(fileName));
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            System.out.println("The file " + fileName + " doesn't exist in the folder.");
        }

        String line;
        String[] splitLine;
        StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder("");

        while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
            splitLine = line.split("\t");
            stringBuilder.append(line);

            /* If the String array resulting of the split operation doesn't have size 4,
             * then it means that there are elements of the news item missing in the line
             */
            while (splitLine.length != 4) {
                line = reader.readLine();
                stringBuilder.append(line);

                splitLine = stringBuilder.toString().split("\t");
            }
            stringBuilder.append("\n");
            writer.write(stringBuilder.toString());
            stringBuilder = new StringBuilder("");

            writer.flush();
        }

        writer.close();
        reader.close();

    }

I've already looked for answers, but the problem is usually related to the fact that the writer is not being closed or the absence of the flush() method. Therefore, I'm thinking that the problem is in the BufferedReader. What am I missing?

share|improve this question
1  
Did you try correctly using flush..? – Vipar Oct 10 '12 at 18:14
    
I first tried using flush after a certain number of times (500 to be exact), hoping to avoid flushing in every iteration of the cycle, but it did not work. What is the correct way to use flush? – Judas Oct 10 '12 at 18:19
    
Could you provide at least some records from the input file (the one which has 600 MB)? – Jagger Oct 10 '12 at 18:21
    
Why didn't you just try and flush after every iteration..? – Vipar Oct 10 '12 at 18:21
    
Unfortunately I cannot, since it's sensitive information. Most of the lines have the following format: Theme\tDate\tTitle\tDescription Some of the lines have a \n separating contents. the objective of the formatting is to have all of the contents in a single line. – Judas Oct 10 '12 at 18:23
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Look at this loop:

while (splitLine.length != 4) {
    line = reader.readLine();
    stringBuilder.append(line);

    splitLine = stringBuilder.toString().split("\t");
}

If you ever end up with more than 5 items in splitLine, you'll just keep reading data forever... you won't even notice when you've reached the end of the file, as you'll just keep appending null to the StringBuilder. I don't know whether this is what's happening (we don't know what your data looks like) but it's certainly feasible, and you should guard against it.

(You should also use a try/finally block for closing resources, but that's a separate matter.)

share|improve this answer
    
That worked, man that was a stupid mistake. I just changed the operator from != to <. Thanks. – Judas Oct 10 '12 at 18:48
1  
@Judas: Well it's not clear that that's really the right fix - and if you get to the end of the file, it will still iterate forever. I've diagnosed the problem, but you may need to think more carefully about the solution. – Jon Skeet Oct 10 '12 at 18:51
    
It wrote all the contents to the file and there were no problems with the end of the file. Still, another problem emerged, but I should be fine now. Thanks again! – Judas Oct 10 '12 at 19:11
    
@Judas: Is that the only file you're ever going to run this code on? If so, that's great. If not - you should consider what might happen with a different file... – Jon Skeet Oct 10 '12 at 19:12

Separate out the FileOutputStream as it's own variable and close it, too:

FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(destFile);
writer = new OutputStreamWriter(fos);

   ...

writer.flush();
fos.flush();
share|improve this answer
  1. The try/catch isn't well coded, in case of errors the process continue.
  2. You may replace

        stringBuilder = new StringBuilder("");
    

    by

        stringBuilder.setLength( 0 );
    
  3. Use your own parser line.indexOf('\t',from) in place of String.split()

  4. Add the parts obtained with line.substring( b, e ) to a List< String >
  5. Use a PrintStream with correct character set, use the constructor with two parameters
  6. Write the information 4 by 4, consuming data from the list, when list.size() >= 4
share|improve this answer

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