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I'm investigating automated testing of an existing web application. I ran into the following problem while trying to select certain document nodes by XPath.

On a particular screen, the application shows a tab control with five tabs. The raw HTML behind this tab controls is as follows:

<ul class="tab_set-tabs">
    <span id="forTab">
        <li class="tab_set-tabSelectionAware">
            <a href="javascript:void(0);" id="tabOption_tabSet1">
                <strong id="tabOption_tabSet1" class="">
                    Vendor
                </strong>   
            </a>
        </li>
    </span><span id="forTab_0">
        <li class="tab_set-tabSelectionAware">
            <a href="javascript:void(0);" id="tabOption_tabSet2">
                <strong id="tabOption_tabSet2" class="">
                    Ship To
                </strong>   
            </a>
        </li>
    </span><span id="forTab_1">
        <li class="tab_set-tabSelectionAware">
            <a href="javascript:void(0);" id="tabOption_tabSet3">
                <strong id="tabOption_tabSet3" class="">
                    Comments
                </strong>   
            </a>
        </li>
    </span><span id="forTab_2">
        <li class="tab_set-tabSelectionAware">
            <a href="javascript:void(0);" id="tabOption_tabSet4">
                <strong id="tabOption_tabSet4" class="">
                    Custom
                </strong>   
            </a>
        </li>
    </span><span id="forTab_3">
        <li class="tab_set-tabSelectionAware">
            <a href="javascript:void(0);" id="tabOption_tabSet5">
                <strong id="tabOption_tabSet5" class="">
                    History
                </strong>   
            </a>
        </li>
    </span>
</ul>

As you can see, there are 5 sibling "span" nodes, each representing one of 5 tabs. However, when I look at this same section of HTML in IE9's Developer tools, I see this:

Tried to post a screen cap of IE DevTools, but as a new user, the site won't let me, so here's a approximation of what I'm seeing:

[-] <ul class="tab_seet-tabs>
    [-] <span id="forTab">
        [-] <li ...>
            [+] <a ...>
            [-] <span id="forTab_0">
                [-] <li ...>
                    [+] <a ...>
                    [-] <span id="forTab_1">
                        [-] <li ...>
                            [+] <a ...>
                            [-] <span id="forTab_2">
                                [-] <li ...>
                                    [+] <a ...>
                                    [-] <span id="forTab_3">
                                        [-] <a ...>
                                            [+] <strong id="tabOption_tabSet5">

So IE appears to be parsing the HTML incorrectly and treating the sibling span nodes as descendants of each other (or more specifically, it sees each span as a child of the previous span's li child).

This is not just a quirk of the Developer tools. Using our test tool, I'm trying to click the 5th tab labeled "History" using the following xpath:

//form[@id="form"]/ul/span/li/a[contains(strong,"History")]

This works fine in firefox and chrome, but fails to find the node in IE9. However, if I try this xpath in IE9 it works:

//form[@id="form"]/ul/span/li/span/li/span/li/span/li/span/li/a[contains(strong,"History")]

Any idea what could cause IE9 to fail so miserably at parsing basic HTML parent/sibling/child node relationships?

share|improve this question
2  
Your html is invalid. Only li can be children of ul/ol, also you are placing block elements in inline elements. –  Musa Oct 10 '12 at 18:23
    
+1 musa. Just add the id directly to each LI and get rid of all the spans. –  Jamie Treworgy Oct 10 '12 at 18:48
    
Yep, it looks like that was indeed the cause, thanks. –  jkindwall Oct 10 '12 at 19:35
    
You might not need the id's at all, its seems your ids are just numbers, can you use CSS child selectors instead? –  Lego Stormtroopr May 16 '13 at 1:50

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