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I'm going to apologize ahead of time for the length of this post. I just want to be sure I didn't leave any info out.

I have an application which uses django's ORM outside of a django app, which uses "syncdb" by calling call_command('syncdb') directly (note: I'm using a virtualenv for every scenario listed below).

My unit tests in the application try to setup a "test" django database using SQLite as the backend (whereas the production environment uses MySQL).

Each time one of the unit tests runs, it calls call_command('syncdb') using the same test django settings throughout each test.

I am able to run these unit tests on 2 different environments (one with Windows 7/Python 2.7.3, another with Mac OS X ML/Python 2.7.2). There are no issues at all with the tests; but these are relatively clean Python installs on both.

However, when I try to run this on a RHEL server, I get the following error, when the unit tests try to run syncdb:

DatabaseError: table "my_app_mytable" already exists

After a lot of frustrating googling and debugging, I (think) I've eliminated the bugs reported here and here.

I did a lot of hacking around, and I think I have narrowed the problem down to this statement in django's syncdb command file (as crazy as that sounds) (line 59):

tables = connection.introspection.table_names()

I setup a pdb.set_trace() inside django's syncdb source on both environments to take a look. Here is what I found:

(Env that works)

(Pdb) tables
[u'my_app_mytable', u'my_app_myothertable']

Seems OK there. From the looks of the syncdb file, django uses the tables variable to check an app's models against what's already in the database.

(Env that doesn't work)

(Pdb) tables
[u'm\x00y\x00_\x00a\x00p\x00p\x00_\x00m\x00y\x00t\x00a\x00', u'm\x00y\x00_\x00a\x00p\x00p\x00_\x00m\x00y\x00o\x00t\x00']

Unless I'm just going crazy, I think this is making the following statement in django's source return false:

def model_installed(model):
        opts = model._meta
        converter = connection.introspection.table_name_converter
        return not ((converter(opts.db_table) in tables) or
            (opts.auto_created and converter(opts.auto_created._meta.db_table) in tables))

This method is called via filter a few lines after that definition, and it looks like it checks to see if converter(opts.db_table) is in the tables list. I ran them manually in both environments too:

(Env that works)

(Pdb) opts = all_models[0][1][0]._meta
(Pdb) converter = connection.introspection.table_name_converter
(Pdb) converter(opts.db_table) in tables
True

As you can see I (kind of) manually ran the model_installed function to see what converter(opts.db_table) returns, and it looks like a perfectly normal string on both environments. However:

(Env that doesn't work)

(Pdb) opts = all_models[0][1][0]._meta
(Pdb) converter = connection.introspection.table_name_converter
(Pdb) converter(opts.db_table) in tables
False

So it looks like since the tables variable is a list of crazy-looking crud on the broken environment, that method is falsely claiming that each model's table name isn't in the database, which gives me the original error I stated at the beginning.

Just to make sure I really wasn't going nuts, I also tried manually inserting the correct list to compare:

(Env that doesn't work)

(Pdb) converter(opts.db_table) in [u'my_app_mytable', u'my_app_myothertable']
True

Do I need to recompile Python on this environment? I read the following question on stackoverflow, and found my broken environment was exhibiting weird behavior:

(myvirtualenv)[username@myserver]$ python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 12 2012, 10:40:11)
[GCC 4.4.6 20110731 (Red Hat 4.4.6-3)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import StringIO, cStringIO, sys
>>> StringIO.StringIO(u"fubar").getvalue()
u'fubar'
>>> cStringIO.StringIO(u"fubar").getvalue()
'fubar'
>>> cStringIO.StringIO(u"\u0405\u0406").getvalue()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode characters in position 0-1: ordinal not in range(128)
>>> sys.maxunicode
65535
>>> sys.byteorder
'little'

EDIT: OK, so I looked a little bit through the django source some more, and it looks like they're getting the table list this way:

def get_table_list(self, cursor):
    "Returns a list of table names in the current database."
    # Skip the sqlite_sequence system table used for autoincrement key
    # generation.
    cursor.execute("""
        SELECT name FROM sqlite_master
        WHERE type='table' AND NOT name='sqlite_sequence'
        ORDER BY name""")
    return [row[0] for row in cursor.fetchall()]

So I connected to the sqlite file manually in the python interpreter, and ran that query:

(Env that doesn't work)

>>> import sqlite3
>>> conn = sqlite3.connect('/path/to/sqlite/file')
>>> curs = conn.cursor()
>>> curs.execute("""
... SELECT name FROM sqlite_master
... WHERE type='table' AND NOT name='sqlite_sequence'
... ORDER BY name""")
<sqlite3.Cursor object at 0xb7557500>
>>> curs.fetchall()
[(u'c\x00c\x00_\x00s\x00t\x00a\x00t\x00s\x00_\x00c\x00c\x00',), (u'c\x00c\x00_\x00s\x00t\x00a\x00t\x00s\x00_\x00c\x00c\x00s',)]

So it looks like SQLite returns a UTF16-LE string for that query. On the working environment, it returned the following:

(Env that works)

>>> curs.fetchall()
[(u'my_app_mytable',), (u'my_app_myothertable',)]

Even without an encoding defined at the top, the "working" environment doesn't seem to have any trouble interpreting my models file and creating the tables appropriately. Is there some SQLite default setting that is causing this? Or is git converting the file to UTF-16LE on the broken environment, and sticking with UTF-8/ASCII in the working environment?

share|improve this question
    
Where are you getting that broken unicode (which is actually UTF-16LE except it's in a unicode) from, and what does cStringIO have to do with it? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 10 '12 at 18:46
    
In the original question it looks like the cStringIO.StringIO(u"fubar").getvalue() call returns a string like 'f\x00u\x00b\x00a\x00r\x00'. I think I might have read the question wrong, is the behavior I showed in my question the expected behavior? –  Nitzle Oct 10 '12 at 18:51

3 Answers 3

I encountered a similar problem, same syncdb command executed successfully on one environment and not on other with same database imports and model. Changing call_command(syncdb) to os.system('python ' + |path|, 'manage.py syncdb')) solved it for me.

Hope it helps others.

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Your text editor has decided to save the file as UTF-16LE. Put the following at the top of your source files, below the shebang:

# -*- coding: utf-16le -*-
share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting strange behavior with that encoding. I added it to the top of my source files but I'm getting a SyntaxError: invalid syntax which seems to be pointing to the EOF newline. –  Nitzle Oct 10 '12 at 19:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, it seems like my sqlite3 module was acting up. I ended up reinstalling Red Hat's sqlite-devel package, recompiling Python 2.7.3, and then updating the executable in the virtualenv.

Seems to be working well now. Now when I run django's get_table_list() query, I get the following:

>>> import sqlite3
>>> conn = sqlite3.connect('/path/to/sqlite/file')
>>> curs = conn.cursor()
>>> curs.execute("""
... SELECT name FROM sqlite_master
... WHERE type='table' AND NOT name='sqlite_sequence'
... ORDER BY name""")
<sqlite3.Cursor object at 0xb7774ca0>
>>> curs.fetchall()
[(u'my_app_mytable',), (u'my_app_myothertable',)]

I made no changes to the sqlite file itself, so it seems this was an issue either with the sqlite3 module, and/or my Python 2.7.3 installation.

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