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The following is a small scale example of the problem I am facing. In the example below I use int pointers but in my own code I am really using a pointer to another class (a node class).

The problem appears to be that I am using a call by value pointer (if there is such a thing). I don't know, I thought pointers were by reference.
I do need to be able to pass multiple pointers to the method and I do not really want to write a specific method for each pointer.
When I run the code, of course, I get some kind of error because it is trying to access a pointer that has not been allocated. I do not understand why it would not initialize the correct pointer if I pass the specific pointer I want.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Test {
  private:
    int *p1;   
    int *p2;
    int sizeP1;
    int sizeP2;   
  public:
    int* getIntPointer() {return p1;}
    void initializeP1(int *ip,int n){
        sizeP1=n; 
        ip=new int[n];

        for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
            p1[i]=i;         
    }  
    void printP1() {
        for(int i=0;i<sizeP1;i++)
            cout<<p1[i]<<" "; 
    }
};

int main() {
    Test t;
    t.initializeP1(t.getIntPointer(),10);
    t.printP1(); //this fails.. but why? How can I fix it?

    return 0;
}
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4 Answers 4

The problem is that you initialize ip and you fill p1

void initializeP1(int **ip,int n){
        sizeP1=n; 
        *ip=new int[n];

        for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
            *ip[i]=i;         
    }  
//call with p1

initializeP1(&p1, 10); // pass pointer to pointer so you can get return value.
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Hi Tony, I tried that but it is not working for me. –  Marky17 Oct 10 '12 at 19:26
    
I'm not sure how to correctly do syntax highlighting in here, but I did change it to how you show above. The only difference is that my initializeP1 method is inside the class and I call it like you showed in the main method. However, I passed in p1 like this. int* p=t.getIntPointer(); t.initializeP1(&p,10); –  Marky17 Oct 10 '12 at 19:32

The problem is that your function allocates memory to the copy of the pointer that is the argument - this copy is lost at function exit. Pass the pointer by reference instead by changing the function signature

  void initializeP1(int* &ip,int n){
                         ^

This way the allocated memory is still accessible and your pointer will point to it

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Would it not simply be easier to change your initializeP1 function to something like:

int * initializeP1(int n)
{
    sizeP1 = n; 
    p1 = new int[n];

    for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
        p1[i] = i;
    return ip;
}

There are still problems with this however, such as the fact that you can call it repeatedly and cause big memory leaks.

It might be better to use a proper constructor for your class that does what initializeP1 did, like such:

Test(int n)
{
    sizeP1 = n; 
    p1 = new int[n];

    for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
        p1[i] = i;
    return ip;
}

Pointers are not passed by reference, no. Pointers are value types. You'd want to use a reference if you absolutely had to make it look like this, but it's an abuse of syntax and you should do it a different way instead.

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The call to t.getIntPointer() returns a pointer that is not initialised to something sensible. The call to initializeP1() is newing an array of ints. But be careful, this allocated block of memory will not be freed until you tell it so by writing "delete [] p1;".

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