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I have a problem with system() function.

I need to implement a simple bash, one of the modules of the my project is to permit user types some bash command to execute it.

Above what i'm doing actually:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

// similar to gets
int reads(char* str)
{
#ifndef WIN32
    fflush(stdout);
    strcpy(str,GetServiceLine());
#else
    gets(str);
#endif

    return 1;
}

int main(void) {
    char str[100];

        while(strcmp(str, "exit")) {
            printf("\nNote: type \"exit\" to return menu\n");
            printf("MyBash$ ");
            reads(str);

            system(str);
        }

    return 0;
}

My problem is with commands like ping.

When i run this code on my PC and i try execute ping command for a legal IP it works fine, i can stop the ping process using CTRL+C, but when i run it on my target on the same way i can't use CTRL+C and my process keep always at system() call.

Does somebody can help me?

Note: i read this post about how to use CTRL+C to break a system function. I tried the suggestion but didn't work.

Thanks.

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3  
short answer: you can't. You could instead use popen(), popen will terminate the child process if the pipe is closed. –  wildplasser Oct 10 '12 at 19:04
1  
For ping: you can specify the seconds with -c:ping -c 2 127.0.0.1 and then ping command will exit normally. –  Blue Moon Oct 10 '12 at 19:05
    
Did you try installing a signal handler to catch the CTRL+C? –  Mike Oct 10 '12 at 19:07
    
@wildplasser i'll try use your solution, i'll post here if it works in this case. Thanks. –  Adriano Leal Oct 10 '12 at 19:08
    
@KingsIndian, the problem is the user choice. They can write -c second or not... =( –  Adriano Leal Oct 10 '12 at 19:10

3 Answers 3

Since you hadn't tried it yet I'll throw it up here as a suggestion. You can always install a signal handler to catch signals that you are interested in.

Here's a quick example using (mostly) your code which demonstrates how it's done:

#include <signal.h>
#include <stdio.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <string.h>   

void intHandler(int dummy) 
{
    exit(1);   // Do whatever you want here to handle it...
}

int main(void) 
{
    char str[100];
    signal(SIGINT, intHandler);   
    signal(SIGKILL, intHandler);
    while(strcmp(str, "exit")) {
       printf("\nNote: type \"exit\" to return menu\n");
       printf("MyBash$ ");
       gets(str);
       system(str);
    }      
    return 0; 
} 

I can catch a ctrl+C using this, but I'm not sure if it's what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
I doubt this would work alone. Because system effectively forks another process to execute the command which won't be affected by killing the parent in this case. Even if you send a killpid or something to that process, it won't work because 'the system() function shall ignore the SIGINT and SIGQUIT signals, and shall block the SIGCHLD signal, while waiting for the command to terminate' pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/system.html –  fayyazkl Oct 10 '12 at 19:34

After the comments above i just thought of explaining why exactly you can't control this in a graceful manner (some hacks are suggested in comments though).

system command is going to behave exactly if you forked a child process and then called exec on the child for executing the binary passed to exec as an argument.

The system() function shall ignore the SIGINT and SIGQUIT signals, and shall block the SIGCHLD signal, while waiting for the command to terminate. If this might cause the application to miss a signal that would have killed it, then the application should examine the return value from system() and take whatever action is appropriate.

Remember, this is very much OS specific behavior and there is no standard as such.

system() function call in Linux

Internally ping utility would run on icmp and waits until a response is received from the other node.

You might write a signal handler as suggested in another answer and call a killpid() but it would be blocked until the call to system() returns. This is stated in the specs of the function. So you might be able to terminate but only AFTER the call has returned. :)

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Hey @fayyazkl, i understood your explaining. Well, i'll try kill my ping process opened with system() function, saving it pid using pidof, using & after ping command and handling signals. I'll implement and post results. Thanks. –  Adriano Leal Oct 10 '12 at 20:17
    
Well really didn't work. CTRL+C just appears like a strange unicode byte on the my bash and the handler doesn't called. –  Adriano Leal Oct 10 '12 at 20:40
    
@AdrianoLeal 'didn't work' does reveal much. If you like help with it, please post your code and explain explicitly what output you are getting. –  fayyazkl Oct 11 '12 at 4:21
    
i did exactly what @Mike suggested me below. I just joined my code with his suggestion, so is obvious, right? Thanks for your answer, i'm working to fix my problem yet. –  Adriano Leal Oct 11 '12 at 12:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Below the code used to fix my problem. I don't know if is the better solution, but solved my problem in this case.

#include <signal.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

// similar to gets
int reads(char* str)
{
#ifndef WIN32
    fflush(stdout);
    strcpy(str,GetServiceLine());
#else
    gets(str);
#endif

    return 1;
}

void getCommandName(char input[], char output[])
{
    int count=0;

    while (input[count] != NULL && input[count] != ' ' && input[count] != '\0') {
        output[count] = input[count];
        count++;
    }
}

int killLastCommand(int pid)
{
    char commandKill[30];

    memset(commandKill, 0, 30);

    sprintf(commandKill, "kill -9 %d", pid);
    return(!system(commandKill));
}

int main(void) {
    FILE *fp; //Will be used with popen()
    char str[100];
    char lastCommandName[50];
    char pidofCommand[50];
    char strLastPIDCommand[10];
    int lastPIDCommand=0;

    memset (str, 0, 100);

        while(strcmp(str, "exit")) {
        if (lastPIDCommand == 0) {
            memset (lastCommandName, 0, 50); //Clean lastCommandName array
            memset (pidofCommand, 0, 50); //Clean pidofCommand array
            memset (strLastPIDCommand, 0, 10); //Clean strLastPIDCommand array

            printf("\n\nNote: type \"exit\" to return menu\n");
            printf("MyBash$ ");
                reads(str);

            if (strcmp(str, "exit")) {
                    sprintf(str, "%s &", str);
            }

            getCommandName(str, lastCommandName);

            system(str);
            sleep(1); //Sleep to guarantee than command will end

            sprintf(pidofCommand, "pidof %s", lastCommandName); 

            //Saving PID
            fp = popen(pidofCommand, "r");

            if (fp) {
                fgets(strLastPIDCommand, 10, fp);
                lastPIDCommand = atoi(strLastPIDCommand);
            } else {
                //Handle error
            }
            pclose(fp);

printf("commandName = %s\r\n", lastCommandName);
printf("pid = %d\r\n", lastPIDCommand);
        } else {
            printf("\n\nYou have a command running, press 'kill' to stop it before to type another command\n");
            printf("EITVBash$ \n\n");
            reads(str);

//          if (str[0] == 0x03) { //CTRL+C hexa code
            if (!strcmp(str, "kill")) {
                if (killLastCommand(lastPIDCommand)) {
                    lastPIDCommand = 0;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

My implementation probably isn't clean, but i don't have much experience with c.

Thanks everybody.

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