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I saw the example with Flower an MyGarden, but when I try to make something similar it doesn't work. My code:

ClassA.h:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@protocol CommDelegate <NSObject>
@required
-(void)funcB;
@end

@interface ClassA : NSObject
{
    id <CommDelegate> delegate;
}
@property (retain) id delegate;
-(void)funcB;
@end

ClassA.m

#import "ClassA.h"

@implementation ClassA
-(void) start
{
    [[self delegate] funcB];
}
@end

ClassB.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import "ClassA.h"

@interface ClassB : NSObject <CommDelegate>
@end

ClassB.m

#import "ClassB.h"

@implementation ClassB
-(void)funcB
{
    NSLog(@"HELLO!");
}
@end

And in main I'm doing:

ClassA* classa = [[ClassA alloc] init];
[classa start];

Could someone help me, and tell what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Caleb, matt, omz, DShah, BNL Oct 11 '12 at 17:36

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
What do you mean by "doesn't work"? Doesn't compile? Crashes when run? Runs successfully but behaves unexpectedly? Be clear and precise! – Adam Rosenfield Oct 10 '12 at 19:22
1  
Agree with @AdamRosenfield. As posed, this is not a question. You show your code; that's good. But you must say what you expected and what actually happened when you ran that code. – matt Oct 10 '12 at 19:23
    
While it is important to state what is not working it was quite clear what was wrong with the code... delegate was never assigned. – Joe Oct 10 '12 at 19:28
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Delegation overview summary:

  1. Create a @protocol which is the methods that you wish to be callable from the delegator but are provided by your delegate.
  2. Add delegate @property in delegator's public @interface.
  3. Use delegate property inside delegator's implementation e.g. result = [self.delegate methodInProtocol]
  4. Set the delegate property somewhere in the delegate's @implementation: delegator.delegate = self;
  5. Implement the protocol method(s) in the delegate (include <> on @interface)

The delegate is just a pointer to an object that will implement the necessary methods for you. In your case, I think you want classA to be able to call a funcB method, but for that funcB to be implemented by someone else.

There needs to be a delegate property in the class that wants to have another class implement these methods and then in the class that is to be the delegate, it should set the delegate property to self.

As others have noted, you don't set your delegate. Somewhere in classB you need a

ClassA.delegate = self;
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for not writing what was wrong. I thought it was quite obvious. Anyway, thank you very much - I did as you told (classa.delegate = classb) and everything is working. – szymciolop Oct 10 '12 at 20:56
    
No problem - only been doing Obj-C for a few months myself and got a semi-decent understanding of delegates within the last couple of months. Are you actually doing classA.delegate=classB and if so, where do you do this? You should be doing classA.delegate = self from within classB. – Steve Ives Oct 10 '12 at 21:26
    
Actually I wrote this to help me understand delegates. I wanted to get the child UIViewController to communicate with it's parent, but it didn't work so I wrote this to help me find errors. Now everything works. – szymciolop Oct 12 '12 at 15:20
ClassA* classa = [[ClassA alloc] init];
[classa start];

It appears that you need to set classa's delegate. Normally, you'd expect the call to -start to invoke the delegate method, but classa doesn't have a delegate here. Do this:

ClassB* classb = [[ClassB alloc] init];
ClassA* classa = [[ClassA alloc] init];
classa.delegate = classb;
[classa start];
share|improve this answer
  1. You never set the delegate
  2. You generally assign delegates rather than retain them to avoid retain cycles. (The object that assigns the delegate usually will have a strong reference to the objecte and is responsible for setting the delegate to nil when done)

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
@protocol CommDelegate <NSObject>
@required
-(void)funcB;
@end

@interface ClassA : NSObject
{
    id <CommDelegate> delegate;
}
@property (assign) id delegate; //assign
-(void)funcB;
@end

This is the important part:

ClassA* classa = [[ClassA alloc] init]; //Consider creating an init method that accepts the delegate
classa.delegate = self; //Assuming self conforms to CommDelegate
[classa start];
share|improve this answer

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