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I don't know why this method is throwing an ArrayIndexOutOfBounds exception.

When I change the initial "high" value to "int high = array.length - 1;", the program will return any integer value that I search for.

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks in advance!


public class BinarySearch {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int searchValue = 12;
    int[] givenNums = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
    binarySearch(givenNums, searchValue);
    System.out.println("\nResult: " + searchValue);

}

public static int binarySearch(int[] array, int key) {
    int low = 0;
    int high = array.length;
    int mid = (low + high) / 2;
    int i = 0;
    System.out.println();

    while (low <= high) {
        System.out.print(i + " ");
        if (array[mid] < key) {
            low = mid + 1;
            mid = (low + high) / 2;
        } else if (array[mid] > key) {
            high = mid - 1;
            mid = (low + high) / 2;
        }
        else
            return mid;

        i++;
    }
    return -1;
}
}
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1  
You just posted a very similar question. You've already been told why this error happens: you cannot set high to array.length. Having the code fail to run to its completion is not preferable over having it fail to produce the correct answer (at least not in this case). You're not fixing anything by setting high to array.length instead of array.length - 1, you're only making things worse. –  NullUserException Oct 10 '12 at 20:03
    
@user1735982.. See my post to understand what exactly you are doing.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 10 '12 at 20:08
    
Different method, different problem. –  Lethal Left Eye Oct 10 '12 at 20:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to be consistent about whether high means the maximum value it can be inclusively or exclusively. You start off with it being an exclusive upper bound:

int high = array.length;

But then your while loop condition is only appropriate if it's an inclusive upper bound:

while (low <= high)

You should probably just change the while condition to:

while (low < high)

... and change the assignment of high later, too.

Alternatively, you could keep it inclusive, and change the initial value to array.length - 1.

That will stop the situation where low == high == mid == array.length, which is where it would blow up.

I'd also suggest moving the mid = (low + high) / 2 computation to be the first statement within the while loop - then you can get rid of the duplicate code.

while (low < high) {        
    mid = (low + high) / 2;
    System.out.print(i + " ");
    if (array[mid] < key) {
        low = mid + 1;
    } else if (array[mid] > key) {
        high = mid;
    }
    else {
        return mid;
    }
    i++;
}
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The maximum index of an array is array.length - 1 as they start from 0.

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Arrays in java are indexed from 0, that means...

int[] arr = new int[10];

First value is arr[0] and last is arr[9], length is 10.

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