Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Bear with me as Im very new with working with audio and I have been googling for days for a solution and not finding any.

So i retrieve the byte array of a .wav file with this (source: Wav file convert to byte array in java)

ByteArrayOutputStream out = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
BufferedInputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(WAV_FILE));

int read;
byte[] buff = new byte[1024];
while ((read = in.read(buff)) > 0)
{
     out.write(buff, 0, read);
}
out.flush();
byte[] audioBytes = out.toByteArray();

And then i convert the byte array to a float array and normalize it from -1.0 to 1.0. (source: Convert wav audio format byte array to floating point)

ShortBuffer sbuf =
ByteBuffer.wrap(audioBytes).order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN).asShortBuffer();
short[] audioShorts = new short[sbuf.capacity()];
sbuf.get(audioShorts);

float[] audioFloats = new float[audioShorts.length];
for (int i = 0; i < audioShorts.length; i++) {
    audioFloats[i] = ((float)audioShorts[i])/0x8000;
}
return audioFloats;

Later i convert this to line drawings which outputs the waveform using java.swing

class Panel2 extends JPanel {
float[] audioFloats;

    Dimension d;
    public Panel2(Dimension d, float[] audioFloats) {
        // set a preferred size for the custom panel.
        this.d = d;
        setPreferredSize(d);
        this.audioFloats = audioFloats;
    }


    @Override
    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        //super.paintComponent(g);
        super.paint(g); 

        //shift by 45 because first 44 bytes used for header
        for (int i = 45; i<audioFloats.length; i++){

            Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g;
            float inc = (i-45)*((float)d.width)/((float)(audioFloats.length-45-1));
            Line2D lin = new Line2D.Float(inc, d.height/2, inc, (audioFloats[i]*d.height+d.height/2));
            g2.draw(lin);

        }


    }
}

The waveform only looks right for 16 bit wav files (ive cross checked with goldwave and both my waveform and their waveform look similar for 16 bits).

How do i do this for 8 bit .wav files?

Because this is for homework, my only restriction is read the wav file byte by byte.

I also know the wav files are PCM coded and have the first 44 bytes reserved as the header

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Audio streams are usually interleaved with one channel of data then the opposite channel of data. So for example the first 16 bits would be the left channel, then the next 16 bits would be the right channel. Each of these is considered 1 frame of data. I would make sure that your 8 bit stream is only one channel because it looks like the methods are only set up to read one channel.

Also in your example to convert the frames you are grabbing the individual channel as a short then finding a decimal by dividing that by 0x8000 hex or the maximum value of a signed short.

short[] audioShorts = new short[sbuf.capacity()];
sbuf.get(audioShorts);
...
audioFloats[i] = ((float)audioShorts[i])/0x8000;

My guess is that you need to read the 8 byte stream as a type 'byte' instead of a short then divide that by 128 or the maximum value of a signed 8 bit value. This will involve making a whole new method that processes 8 bit streams instead of 16 bit streams. With the following changes.

byte[] audioBytes = new byte[sbuf.capacity()];
sbuf.get(audioBytes);
...
audioFloats[i] = ((float)audioBytes[i])/0x80;
share|improve this answer
    
Not gonna work. The solution is in fact much simpler. But the point about stereo WAVs is valid. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 10 '12 at 20:59
    
didnt work for me. same response as with @Marko –  user1153395 Oct 10 '12 at 21:26
    
Do you know whether or not it is a single or dual channel stream? –  Jimmy Johnson Oct 10 '12 at 23:28
    
sorry what does that mean? as i said im still new with audio stuff. do u mean if its stereo or mono? i think it would be mono –  user1153395 Oct 10 '12 at 23:37

You need to adapt this part of the code:

ShortBuffer sbuf =
  ByteBuffer.wrap(audioBytes).order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN).asShortBuffer();
short[] audioShorts = new short[sbuf.capacity()];
sbuf.get(audioShorts);

float[] audioFloats = new float[audioShorts.length];
for (int i = 0; i < audioShorts.length; i++) {
    audioFloats[i] = ((float)audioShorts[i])/0x8000;
}

You don't need ByteBuffer at all—you already have your byte array. So just convert it to floats:

float[] audioFloats = new float[audioBytes.length];
for (int i = 0; i < audioBytes.length; i++) {
    audioFloats[i] = ((float)audioBytes[i])/0x80;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for response. It still doesnt show up right though. i checked the values in the float array and almost all seems to be either very close to 1 or -1. the values in the 16 bit array are more spread out between -1 and 1. Does it have something to do with the way im retrieving the byte array in the beginning? –  user1153395 Oct 10 '12 at 21:25
    
To diagnose, print out the raw byte values. See how they are spread. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 10 '12 at 21:28
    
I have, they are not that spread either. The values are either very close to -128 or 127. So when i output the waveform, its like a giant rectangle. –  user1153395 Oct 10 '12 at 21:32
    
If that's the raw data, nothing else can be expected. What makes you so sure this isn't in fact the actual waveform recorded? –  Marko Topolnik Oct 11 '12 at 7:25
    
because when i output it, it looks like a giant rectangle. I used goldwave to see the actual waveform and its not even close to what I have. So i know i must be doing something wrong –  user1153395 Oct 11 '12 at 16:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.