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How can I implement a function increment(string) that given string A produces string B where:

  1. B > A (using Java's compareTo logic)
  2. There exists NO C where B > C > A

And the same for decrement(string) that given string A produces string B where:

  1. B < A (using Java's compareTo logic)
  2. There exists NO C where B < C < A

EDIT

As pointed out in comments, this question is impossible to answer without some restrictions. The restriction is that you cannot append/remove new characters to/from the string unless it's to handle under/over flow.

share|improve this question
    
I think this question is missing a caveat. Namely, that the A and B should be the same length, otherwise the question is impossible to answer fully. With the caveat the question is merely insanely hard. An additional caveat that the string be only made up of ASCII alpha numeric characters would make it a reasonable homework question. – Dunes Oct 10 '12 at 20:50
    
@Dunes: I don't think there's any reason to restrict it to ASCII alpha-numeric characters. Note that compareTo doesn't take into account locale, or anything like that. It doesn't even handle surrogate pairs -slash- full Unicode codepoints. It's strictly a lexicographical comparison of two sequences of unsigned 16-bit integers. – ruakh Oct 10 '12 at 21:01
    
Oh wow, I didn't realise how massively programming languages abuse the term lexicographical. Having looked into it I would say Java sorts according to the numerical order of the code units of UTF-16. Meaning the ordering is not even consistent with any other unicode encoding scheme. Lexicographical order implies the use of a dictionary or lexicon, which implies alphabetical order of the given natural language. Glad I learnt this sooner rather than later. Thanks for pointing that out @ruakh – Dunes Oct 10 '12 at 21:39
    
@Dunes: It's not just a programming use of the term, but a mathematical use. (See the Wikipedia article on "lexicographical order".) The only thing that programming adds over mathematics is that in mathematics, a lexicographical order is normally defined over a set of equal-length sequences (especially ordered pairs), whereas in programming, we generalize it to allow variable-length sequences, by saying that (e.g.) "a" is less than "ab". (And in that respect, of course, we're consistent with regular dictionary-order.) – ruakh Oct 10 '12 at 21:51
    
I maintain that the word is abused when talking about Strings in a programming language. Lexicography is about compiling dictionaries (for natural languages). In mathematics you can escape the tie-in to natural language due to the layer of abstraction. But when talking about a data type that is explicitly about representing the alphabets of natural languages then you need to be more specific about the comparison. Hell, even in the documentation detail it doesn't make clear whether code unit or code point comparisons are being performed. – Dunes Oct 10 '12 at 22:22
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Increment is straightforward: B = A + "\u0000".

Decrement is impossible; the greatest string that is less than "Y", for example, is "X\uFFFF\uFFFF\uFFFF\uFFFF\uFFFF\uFFFF...".

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for thinking outside the box. When I read the question, I was well and truly boggled and ready to scream "impossible". – João Mendes Oct 10 '12 at 20:53
    
This is the correct answer for the original question, but I added a restriction to the original question. – Drew Oct 10 '12 at 20:58
    
@Drew: Your modified question is very vague. I think you need to give at least five or six examples, including edge cases. – ruakh Oct 10 '12 at 21:15

try this: (edit fixed some bugs, edit 2: tests work, but compare fails)

import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import org.junit.After;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;
class Ids {
    Ids(char min,char max) {
        this.min=min;
        this.max=max;
        n=max-min+1;
    }
    String inc(String s) {
        if(print)
            System.out.println("inc "+s);
        String t="";
        char c=s.charAt(s.length()-1);
        char o=c==max?min:(char)(c+1);
        boolean carry=o==min;
        t+=o;
        for(int i=s.length()-2;i>=0;i--) {
            c=s.charAt(i);
            if(carry) {
                o=c==max?min:(char)(c+1);
                carry=o==min;
            } else o=c;
            t+=o;
        }
        if(carry)
            t+=min;
        t=reverse(t);
        if(print)
            System.out.println("inc returns "+t);
        int compare=s.compareTo(t);
        if(compare!=-1)
            System.out.println("compare fails: "+s+"<>"+t+" returns "+compare);
        return t;
    }
    private static String reverse(String t) {
        String t2="";
        for(int i=0;i<t.length();i++)
            t2+=t.charAt(t.length()-1-i);
        return t2;
    }
    String dec(String s) {
        if(print)
            System.out.println("dec "+s);
        String t="";
        char c=s.charAt(s.length()-1);
        if(c==min&&s.length()==1)
            return null;
        char o=c==min?max:(char)(c-1);
        boolean borrow=o==max;
        t+=o;
        if(print)
            System.out.println("last character, t="+t);
        for(int i=s.length()-2;i>=0;i--) {
            c=s.charAt(i);
            if(print)
                System.out.println("in loop, c="+c);
            if(borrow) {
                if(c==min) {
                    o=max;
                    borrow=true;
                } else {
                    o=--c;
                    borrow=false;
                }
                // o=c==min?max:(char)(c-1);
                // borrow=o==max;
            } else o=c;
            if(print)
                System.out.println("in loop, adding: "+o);
            t+=o;
            if(print)
                System.out.println("in loop, t="+t);
        }
        if(borrow)
            t=t.substring(0,t.length()-1);
        t=reverse(t);
        if(print)
            System.out.println("dec returns "+t);
        int compare=s.compareTo(t);
        if(compare!=1)
            System.out.println("compare fails: "+s+"<>"+t+" returns "+compare);
        return t;
    }
    void run(String s) {
        String i=inc(s);
        String d=dec(s);
        System.out.println(d+"<"+s+"<"+i);
    }
    void run() {
        print();
        run("b");
        run("c");
        run("y");
        run("z");
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Ids('a','z').run();
    }
    void print() {
        System.out.println("min="+min+", max="+max+",range="+n);
    }
    static boolean print;
    final char min,max;
    final int n;
}
public class So12827926TestCase {
    @Before public void setUp() throws Exception {
        Ids.print=false;
    }
    @After public void tearDown() throws Exception {
        Ids.print=false;
    }
    @Test public void testIncDecOnOneCharacter() {
        for(char c=ids.min;c<ids.max;c++) {
            String original=""+(char)(c);
            String expected=""+(char)(c+1);
            String actual=ids.inc(""+(char)c);
            assertEquals(expected,actual);
            String duplicate=ids.dec(expected);
            assertEquals(original,duplicate);
        }
    }
    @Test public void testDecIncOnOneCharacter() {
        for(char c=(char)(ids.min+1);c<=ids.max;c++) {
            String original=""+(char)(c);
            String expected=""+(char)(c-1);
            String actual=ids.dec(""+(char)c);
            assertEquals(expected,actual);
            String duplicate=ids.inc(expected);
            assertEquals(original,duplicate);
        }
    }
    @Test public void testIncDecEdgeCaseOnOneCharacter() {
        String original=""+ids.max;
        String expected=""+ids.min+ids.min;
        String actual=ids.inc(original);
        assertEquals(expected,actual);
        String duplicate=ids.dec(expected);
        assertEquals(original,duplicate);
    }
    @Test public void testIncEdgeCaseOnTwoCharacters() {
        String original=""+ids.min+ids.min;
        String expected=""+ids.min+(char)(ids.min+1);
        String actual=ids.inc(original);
        assertEquals(expected,actual);
    }
    @Test public void testDecIncEdgeCaseOnOneCharacter() {
        String original=""+ids.min;
        String expected=null;
        String actual=ids.dec(original);
        assertEquals(expected,actual);
        if(expected!=null) {
            String duplicate=ids.inc(expected);
            assertEquals(original,duplicate);
        }
    }
    @Test public void testIncDecEdgeCaseOnTwoCharacters() {
        String original=""+ids.min+ids.max;
        String expected=""+(char)(ids.min+1)+ids.min;
        String actual=ids.inc(original);
        assertEquals(expected,actual);
        String duplicate=ids.dec(expected);
        assertEquals(original,duplicate);
    }
    @Test public void testDecIncEdgeCaseOnTwoCharacters() {
        String original=""+ids.max+ids.min;
        String expected=""+(char)(ids.max-1)+ids.max;
        String actual=ids.dec(original);
        assertEquals(expected,actual);
        String duplicate=ids.inc(expected);
        assertEquals(original,duplicate);
    }
    @Test public void testIncDecEdgeCaseOnThreeCharacters() {
        String original=""+ids.min+ids.max+ids.max;
        String expected=""+(char)(ids.min+1)+ids.min+ids.min;
        String actual=ids.inc(original);
        assertEquals(expected,actual);
        String duplicate=ids.dec(expected);
        assertEquals(original,duplicate);
    }
    @Test public void testDecIncEdgeCaseOnThreeCharacters() {
        String original=""+ids.max+ids.min+ids.min;
        String expected=""+(char)(ids.max-1)+ids.max+ids.max;
        String actual=ids.dec(original);
        assertEquals(expected,actual);
        String duplicate=ids.inc(expected);
        assertEquals(original,duplicate);
    }
    @Test public void testDecIntForSomeEdgeCases() {
        Ids ids=new Ids('a','z'); 
        for(int i=0;i<originals.length;i++) {
            String original=originals[i];
            String expected=expecteds[i];
            String actual=ids.dec(original);
            assertEquals(expected,actual);
            String duplicate=ids.inc(expected);
            assertEquals(original,duplicate);
        }
    }
    @Test public void testIncDecForSomeEdgeCases() {
        Ids ids=new Ids('a','z'); 
        for(int i=0;i<originals.length;i++) {
            String original=expecteds[i];
            String expected=originals[i];
            String actual=ids.inc(original);
            assertEquals(expected,actual);
            String duplicate=ids.dec(expected);
            assertEquals(original,duplicate);
        }
    }
    @Test public void testInc() {
        Ids ids=new Ids('a','z'); 
        String start=""+ids.min,s=start;
        for(int i=0;i<ids.n-1;i++) 
            s=ids.inc(s);
        assertEquals(""+ids.max,s);
    }
    @Test public void testDec() {
        Ids ids=new Ids('a','z'); 
        String start=""+ids.max,s=start;
        for(int i=0;i<ids.n-1;i++) 
            s=ids.dec(s);
        assertEquals(""+ids.min,s);
    }
    Ids ids=new Ids('a','b');
    // swap these, they will make more sense that way.
    static final String[] originals=new String[]{"baa","caa","daa","xaa","yaa","zaa"};
    static final String[] expecteds=new String[]{"azz","bzz","czz","wzz","xzz","yzz"};
}
share|improve this answer
    
currently fails on decrementing 3 characters edge case – Ray Tayek Oct 11 '12 at 1:37
    
passes all tests now, but compare is failing – Ray Tayek Oct 12 '12 at 0:46

I think you may write increment as :

    str = str.substring(0, str.length()-1)+((char)(str.charAt(str.length()-1)+1));

And decrement as:

    str = str.substring(0, str.length()-1)+((char)(str.charAt(str.length()-1)-1));

Here be sure of handling boundary conditions i.e. during increment if your string is highest and during decrement, your string is smallest.

share|improve this answer

As you would do with numbers. For example, take a number ABCD. The next number can be found by increasing D by 1. But if this causes D to become 0, you must increase C. And so on. Think of strings as numbers where each digit is actually a 16 bit value. Same way for decreasing. The technical parts on how to do this are in your hands.

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