Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a vertical guideline across my svg that follows the mouse pointer, but right now it's kind of slow to update its position, something that's especially noticeable with rapid mouse movements. Is there a way to reduce this lag?

Current code:

svg.on("mousemove", function(d) {
    svg.select(".guideline")
        .attr("x1", d3.mouse(this)[0]-1)
        .attr("x2", d3.mouse(this)[0]-1);

});

svg.on("mouseover", function(d) {
    svg.append("line")
        .attr("class", "guideline")
        .attr("y1", margin[0])
        .attr("y2", height+margin[0])
        .attr("opacity", originOpacity)
        .attr("stroke", "#333")
        .attr("pointer-events", "none");

});

svg.on("mouseout", function(d) {
    svg.select(".guideline").remove();
});
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

You are selecting the line on every mousemove, keep the line in a variable instead:

var line = svg.append("line")
        .attr("class", "guideline")
        .attr("y1", margin[0])
        .attr("y2", height+margin[0])
        .attr("opacity", 0)
        .attr("stroke", "#333")
        .attr("pointer-events", "none");

svg.on("mousemove", function(d) {

    line
        .attr("x1", d3.event.pageX-1)
        .attr("x2", d3.event.pageY-1);

});

svg.on("mouseover", function(d) {
  line.attr("opacity", originOpacity);
});

svg.on("mouseout", function(d) {
    line.attr("opacity", 0);
});
share|improve this answer
    
This helped to reduce some of the lagging, thank you for that, but I was hoping there was a way to reduce it even more since there still is a very obvious delay when moving the mouse pointer. –  Jimmy C Oct 12 '12 at 12:52
    
d3.event.pageX and .pageY might be faster, I've updated the answer. Beyond that I'm afraid You've already optimized all you could, there's always going to be a slight lag behind the mouse. –  Duopixel Oct 12 '12 at 21:53
    
I dont' think it's the select that is causing the problem with performance, I think it's the rapid modifications to the DOM that the browser can't keep up with. –  Wex Dec 18 '12 at 19:03

I am having the same problem, but I noticed two things:

  1. If you look at High Charts, they have implemented (in their JS library) a similar vertical guideline, which doesn't lag behind so much. So it is possible to do it. See for example: here

  2. I use a container element, to which I added an SVG element, to which I added a group (g) element with a coordinate translation/transformation, like so:

HTML:

<div id="d3-container"></div>

JS:

var svg = d3.select("#d3-container")
    .append("svg")
    .attr("width", width + margin.left + margin.right)
    .attr("height", height + margin.top + margin.bottom)
    .attr("id","d3-svg")
    .append("g")
    .attr("transform", "translate(" + margin.left + "," + margin.top + ")")
    .attr("id","d3-canvas");

The interesting thing is, when I bind mouse events (using the code above in the first answer) to the various elements, I get very different performance: when I bind it to the "d3-canvas" group my guided line is very slow and lags behind, when I bind it to its parent svg element ("d3-svg") it is already faster, and if I bind it to the div ("d3-container") I get the fastest performance (although it is still not as quick as High Stock though). So I am thinking the coordinate transformation adds a lot of overhead to mouse events, but somehow either D3 or SVG is also not optimized for mouse events.

share|improve this answer

Rather than updating the attributes on every mousemove, you could add a couple millisecond delay:

var lastMove, elapsed;
svg.on("mousemove", function(d) {

    elapsed = Date.now() - lastMove;
    if ( elapsed < 40 ) return;

    svg.select(".guideline")
        .attr("x1", d3.mouse(this)[0]-1)
        .attr("x2", d3.mouse(this)[0]-1);

    lastMove = Date.now();
});

This will certainly improve performance, but at the cost of making the movements more choppy. Play around with the number of milliseconds you check for. 40 may be too long.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, this works. I think it is the right way to do it. –  jm1234567890 Aug 19 at 18:13

There is a CSS property called shape-rendering which sets the priority for how your SVGs should be rendered. You can specify auto, optimizeSpeed, crispEdges, or geometricPrecision, where auto tries to accommodate speed and crispness without sacrificing precision.

I have found that settings shape-rendering to auto increased the performance of my crosshair. crispEdges and optimizeSpeed seem to make the cursor disppear intermittently. I was not able to reproduce a smooth crosshair in a fiddle, but in my solution it's actually perfectly smooth now.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.