Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The task of this function is fairly straightforward. Given an array of char*, a pointer to a file, and a maximum word size, it reads through the file and copies each word one by one into the char* array. Since there's one word per line in the file, it makes sense to use \n as the break between words. So with that in mind, the code should be fairly simple to interpret:

void loadDictionary(char* strDictionary[], FILE* filePointer, int nMaxLetters)
{
    int nNameCount= 0, nCursor = 0;
    char* strCurrent;
    char cCurrent;

    //allocate space for a word
    strCurrent = malloc(nMaxLetters * sizeof(char));

    while ((cCurrent = fgetc(filePointer)) != EOF) {

        if(cCurrent != '\n')
        {
            strCurrent[nCursor] = cCurrent;
            nCursor++;

        } else { //then we've reached the end of the line (word)

            //add null termination to string
            strCurrent[nCursor] = '\0'; //SEG FAULT

            //copy string to dictionary
            memcpy(strDictionary[nNameCount], strCurrent, strlen(strCurrent)+1);

            //increment count
            nNameCount++;

            //reset the cursor
            nCursor = 0;
        }
    }
}

This code generates a segmentation fault at the line where I call strCurrent[nCursor] = '\0';. I'm not sure why, because on the face of it, it seems like this operation should be no different from the operation in the other block, where I call strCurrent[nCursor] = cCurrent;. strCurrent should have allocated more than enough space to store all necessary characters. So, I'm somewhat at a loss. Help me figure this one out, guys.

Note: I think I would probably have an easier time using fgets instead of fgetc to accomplish this task. I might well switch to that; however, since I have encountered an error I don't understand, I don't want to leave it alone until I've understood it.

EDIT:

Someone pointed out that the error might occur in the memcpy operation, possibly due to strDictionary being improperly allocated. Here's the main block where strDictionary gets allocated. Perhaps I have made an error:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char** strDictionary;
    FILE* filePointer;
    int nResults = 0, nLines = 0, nNumLines, nMaxChars, i;

    filePointer = fopen("dictionary.txt", "r");

    //obtain the number of lines and the maximum word size of the dictionary
    countLines(filePointer, &nNumLines, &nMaxChars);

    //allocate memory for strDictionary
    strDictionary = malloc(nNumLines * nMaxChars * sizeof(char));
    printf("%d words in dictionary. Longest word is %d letters\n",
            nNumLines, nMaxChars);
    //Output here correctly prints: 1000 and 21

    //reset the file pointer (not sure if this is a necessary step, but oh well)
    filePointer = fopen("dictionary.txt", "r");

    //load dictionary into memory
    loadDictionary(strDictionary, filePointer, nMaxChars);
    for (i=0; i<10; i++)
        printf("%dth element of dictionary: %s\n", i, strDictionary[i]);

    return 0;
}

EDIT 2:

OK, I decided to use fgets() instead of fgetc() to greatly simplify my function. I've also done what I thought was a correct malloc() operation for strDictionary. However, I'm still getting a seg fault. Here's the updated code:

void loadDictionary(char* strDictionary[], FILE* filePointer, int nMaxLetters)
{
    printf("Call to loadDictionary. nMaxLetters = %d\n", nMaxLetters);
    int nWordCount= 0, nCursor = 0;
    char* strCurrent;
    char cCurrent;

    strCurrent = malloc(nMaxLetters); //allocate space for a word


    while (fgets(strCurrent, nMaxLetters, filePointer) != NULL)
    {
        memcpy(strDictionary[nWordCount], strCurrent, strlen(strCurrent)+1);
        nWordCount++;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char** strDictionary;
    FILE* filePointer;
    int nResults = 0, nLines = 0, nNumLines, nMaxChars, i;
    filePointer = fopen("dictionary.txt", "r");

    //count the lines in the file (works fine)
    countLines(filePointer, &nNumLines, &nMaxChars);

    //allocate space for the dictionary
    strDictionary = malloc(nNumLines * sizeof(char*));
    for (i = 0; i<nLines; i++)
        strDictionary[i] = malloc(nMaxChars * sizeof(char));
    printf("%d words in dictionary. Longest word is %d letters\n",
            nNumLines, nMaxChars);

    //load dictionary into array
    filePointer = fopen("dictionary.txt", "r");
    loadDictionary(strDictionary, filePointer, nMaxChars);
    for (i=0; i<10; i++)
        printf("%dth element of dictionary: %s\n", i, strDictionary[i]);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
you might want to check the value of 'nCursor' when it segfaults. ps there is no need to do sizeof(char) it's about the only size that is defined in C –  Martin Beckett Oct 10 '12 at 20:51
1  
Do you know if its on the first word it reads in? How long is the maximum line, how big is nMaxLetters? –  Julian Oct 10 '12 at 20:51
    
Perhaps your code is segfaulting on a line that has nMaxLetters on it, and you didn't account for also including the terminating null character. –  jbowes Oct 10 '12 at 20:53
1  
I suspect it might be the line memcpy(strDictionary[nNameCount], strCurrent, strlen(strCurrent)+1); where it segfaults. Have you allocated enough space to all elements of strDictionary? –  Daniel Fischer Oct 10 '12 at 20:53
    
I suspect it might the malloc(nMaxLetters * sizeof(char)); you aren't allocating +1 for the null-byte-terminator. –  Jack Oct 10 '12 at 20:59

1 Answer 1

Here:

char cCurrent;
...
while ((cCurrent = fgetc(filePointer)) != EOF) {

You are truncating the fgetc()'s value of type int to char. This may lead to the while condition not correctly recognizing EOF. cCurrent has to be int.

Here:

//allocate space for a word
strCurrent = malloc(nMaxLetters * sizeof(char));

nMaxLetters has to account for one extra character representing the string NUL terminator. Is it accounted for?

Btw, sizeof(char) is always 1.

Now, this parameter declaration:

char* strDictionary[]

is equivalent to this:

char** strDictionary

or, IOW, a pointer to a pointer to a char. That's because in C, arrays are never passed as parameters, only pointers to their first elements are, despite the deceptive syntax with the brackets suggesting something is an array.

This line:

memcpy(strDictionary[nNameCount], strCurrent, strlen(strCurrent)+1);

is going to take nNameCount'th pointer to a char and write character data where it points to.

But does the calling function allocate at least as many string buffers (of length nMaxLetters) as there are going to be lines in the file? Does it populate some array of pointers to char with the pointers to these buffers before passing this array into loadDictionary()? IOW, this code is expecting the caller to do something like this:

#define nMaxEntries 1000

char* dictionary[nMaxEntries];
int i;
FILE* f;

...

for (i = 0; i < nMaxEntries; i++)
  dictionary[i] = malloc(nMaxLetters);

loadDictionary(dictionary, f, nMaxLetters);

Memory allocation failures must be checked in the above code. Also, I'd strongly suggest passing nMaxEntries into or using it in loadDictionary() so you don't overrun the array of pointers if the file has more lines than nMaxEntries. nNameCount should not grow beyond nMaxEntries.

UPDATE to the updated question...

Here:

char** strDictionary;
...
strDictionary = malloc(nNumLines * nMaxChars * sizeof(char));

You are not creating an array of pointers to char as loadDictionary() expects per the above analysis, you are creating a 2d array of char. And because of that the segfault most probably occurs not on this line:

 strCurrent[nCursor] = '\0'; //SEG FAULT

but on the very next one, which may not be apparent in the debugger until you zoom in and look at the disassembly of the code:

 //copy string to dictionary
 memcpy(strDictionary[nNameCount], strCurrent, strlen(strCurrent)+1);

UPDATE2:

I don't understand why you now allocate space for nNumLines pointers:

strDictionary = malloc(nNumLines * sizeof(char*));

but of those nNumLines pointers you initialize nLines pointers (and nLines never becomes anything other than 0 if I'm reading your latest code correctly):

for (i = 0; i<nLines; i++)
    strDictionary[i] = malloc(nMaxChars * sizeof(char));

What's the trick? Typo?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.