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I'm terribly sorry for asking yet another anonymous-function question, but it seams like every time I figure them out, javascript throws me another curve ball.

I am using KineticJS to create a number of circles then animate them like so (following these tutorials )

for ( i = 0; i < rows; i++ )
{
   for ( j = 0; j < cols; j++ )
   {
      index = i * cols + j;
      circles [ index ] = new Kinetic.Circle({...});
      ...
   }
}
...
for ( i = 0; i < rows; i++ )
{
   for ( j = 0; j < cols; j++ )
   {
      index = i * cols + j;
      anims [ index ] = new Kinetic.Animation({func: function ( frame )
            {
               ( function ( innerCircle )
               {
                  ...
               } ( circles [ index ] ) );
            },
            node: layer
         }
      );
   }
}

My intention is to pass the current value of index when creating the anonymous function. Problem is that only the last image is being animated and I can't figure out why. Here is the full jsfiddle

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your function that is supposed to create a new variable scope is in the wrong place. It shoudl be outside the function being passed, and should return a new function.

The returned function will have access to the desired value.

for ( i = 0; i < rows; i++ )
{
   for ( j = 0; j < cols; j++ )
   {
      index = i * cols + j;
      anims [ index ] = new Kinetic.Animation({func: function(innerCircle) {
                                                        return function ( frame ) {

                                                        };
                                                      })(circles[index]),
            node: layer
         }
      );
   }
}

But honestly, don't inline functions like this. It becomes so much clearer when you make a named function that returns your function.

function makeFunc(innerCircle) {
    return function (frame) {
           // you can use innerCircle in here
    };
}

for ( i = 0; i < rows; i++ ) {
   for ( j = 0; j < cols; j++ ) {
      index = i * cols + j;
      anims [ index ] = new Kinetic.Animation({
         func: makeFunc(circles[index]),
         node: layer
      });
   }
}

Some people just love those inlined functions for some reason, but I think they just add clutter. A named function breaks up the code a bit, and adds a little documentation to the code.

Also, it's slightly more efficient because you're not making a new inlined function in every iteration of the loop. Instead you're reusing the same one to build the handler.

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thanks for the solution, and for the advice –  puk Oct 10 '12 at 21:40
    
You're welcome. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 10 '12 at 21:50
2  
+1. It's generally better practice to break out functions when using them inside of for loops (due to closures and readability) –  Eric Rowell Oct 10 '12 at 22:47
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