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Say I want a C++ function to perform arithmetic on two inputs, treating them as a given type:

pseudo:

function(var X,var Y,function OP)
{
 if(something)
  return OP<int>(X,Y);
 else if(something else)
  return OP<double>(X,Y);
 else
  return OP<string>(X,Y);
}

functions that fit OP might be like:

template <class T> add(var X,var Y)
{
 return (T)X + (T)Y; //X, Y are of a type with overloaded operators
}

So, the question is what would the signature for function look like? If the operator functions are non-templated I can do it, but I get confused with this extra complexity.

share|improve this question
1  
Look at template template arguments. (And that's not a typo.) –  sbi Aug 16 '09 at 21:00
    
+1, that's basically the correct answer how to pass OP. –  MSalters Aug 17 '09 at 8:29
    
I added this as an answer. I hope I didn't put any stupid errors into it. –  sbi Aug 17 '09 at 18:53

5 Answers 5

I'm a bit confused … why the type differentiation in your pseudo-code?

C++ templates allow full type deduction on templates:

template <typename T, typename F>
T function(T x, T y, F op) {
    return op(x, y);
}

Here, F fits anything (especially functions) that may be called with the () function call syntax and accepting exactly two arguments of type T (or implicitly convertible to it).

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is what I meant, didn't think of a function as a template argument. –  John Aug 17 '09 at 19:36
    
The only problem is that F cannot be template function with unknown template arguments, it either has to be a non-template function, or template function with all its template types specified. –  izogfif Feb 22 '13 at 10:59
    
@izogfif You can also explicitly specify template arguments. Deducing them can be done using template metaprogramming. But anyway it appears that this answered OP’s question, no need to complicate it further. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 22 '13 at 13:07

Are you looking for this?

template<class T> T add(T X, T Y)
{
    return X + Y;
}

Or are you looking for something that calls something like add?

template<class T, class F>
T Apply(T x, T y, F f)
{
    return f( x, y );
}

Called via:

int x = Apply( 2, 4, add<int> );
share|improve this answer
    
I believe he wants to pass add without specifying int as template argument. –  izogfif Feb 22 '13 at 10:57

Template functions cannot be passed as template arguments. You have to manually deduce template arguments for this function before you pass it to another template function. For example, you have function

T sum(T a, T b)
{
    return a + b;
}

You want to pass it to callFunc:

template<typename F, typename T>
T callFunc(T a, T b, F f)
{
    return f(a, b);
}

You can't simply write

int a = callFunc(1, 2, sum);

You have to write

int a = callFunc(1, 2, sum<int>);

To be able to pass sum without writing int, you have to write a functor - struct or class with operator() that will call your template function. Then you can pass this functor as template argument. Here is an example.

template<class T>
T sum(T a, T b)
{
    return a + b;
}
template<class T>
struct Summator
{
    T operator()(T a, T b)
    {
        return sum<T>(a, b);
    }
};
template<template<typename> class TFunctor, class T>
T doSomething(T a, T b)
{
    return TFunctor<T>()(a, b);
    //Equivalent to this:
    //TFunctor<T> functor;
    //return functor(a, b);
}


int main()
{
    int n1 = 1;
    int n2 = 2;
    int n3 = doSomething<Summator>(n1, n2); //n3 == 3
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This confusion wouldn’t arise in the first place if people used the correct terminology: “template functions” don’t exist, they are “function templates”. That is, in your example callFunc(1, 2, sum); you are not passing a function to callFunc, you are passing a template to it (and as your example shows you can pass templates as template arguments, but only class template, not function templates). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 22 '13 at 13:16
    
Hm.. Didn't think about it this way. I believe the original question should be "How to pass function template as function template argument" then, right? –  izogfif Feb 22 '13 at 20:13

I think you're looking for the Strategy Pattern.

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I'm not sure what this var thing in your question means. It's certainly not a valid C++ keyword, so I assume it's a type akin to boost:any. Also, the function is missing a result type. I added another var, whatever that might be. The your solution could look like this:

template< template<typename> class Func >
var function(var X, var Y, Func OP)
{
 if(something)
  return OP<int>(X,Y);
 else if(something else)
  return OP<double>(X,Y);
 else
  return OP<string>(X,Y);
}

The funny template argument is a template itself, hence its name "template template argument". You pass in the name of a template, not an instance. That is, you pass std::plus, not std::plus<int>:

return function( a, b, std::plus );
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work in Visual C++ 2008, Visual C++ 2010 due to compilation error. –  izogfif Feb 22 '13 at 10:47
    
@izogfif: Now imaging, for a moment, you had provided the exact compiler error. Someone might have come along, looked at it, understood what the problem is, and posted a solution. Of course, we don't want this, so it's good you haven't provided that. –  sbi Feb 22 '13 at 15:20
    
Good point. Here is the code I tried to compile and errors raised by compiler (at the end of the code): pastebin.com/YyhX9ruT –  izogfif Feb 22 '13 at 20:29

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