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>>> a=3
>>> a+2.0
5.0
>>> a=a+1.0
>>> a
4.0

Can't understand why 4.0 is coming. I think 6.0 should be the answer. Please explain why the result is 4.0.

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Second line should be a+=2 to get what you expect. – user688635 Oct 10 '12 at 22:14
1  
there seems to be a slight knowledge disconnect here ... you must assign to change value ... – Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 22:14
    
Note you should be careful mixing integer and floating point values. If you intend to always have whole numbers, stick with integers. It will improve performance, but more importantly, it will mean you avoid bugs introduced by the inexact nature of doing arithmetic with floating point values. – Silas Ray Oct 10 '12 at 22:16
up vote 5 down vote accepted

On the second line when you do a+2.0, you are not modifying the value of a, so on the third line a is still 3 and a+1.0 is 4.0 as expected.

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thank you so much..!!! – Shivam Chopra Oct 10 '12 at 22:20

If you look carefully, you are not assigning the result of your expression: a+2.0 is surely 5.0 as printed, but a is unchanged as there is no assignment (a=a+2.0) to a

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You aren't assigning the result of a+2.0 back to a, so when you subsequently do a=a+1.0, a is still set to 3.

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Others have directly answered your question. Here is another thing to consider when working at the prompt.

>>> a=3 # assignment does not update '_'
>>> a # have to ask for the value of 'a' so it ends up in '_'
3
>>> _ + 2.0
5.0
>>> _ + 1.0
6.0

You can always use '_' which means "the value of the last result".

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