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I am using a windows 7 computer so I have defined WINVER and _WIN32_WINNT to reflect that. However, when windows.h is included, it does not see the original #define and redefines the values to the default 0x0400. My code is below. This is on a Windows 7 PC in QT creator with mingw g++. Any ideas as to why this is happening?

#define WINVER 0x0601
#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0601

#if WINVER > 0x0600
#define GOOD
#endif

#include <windows.h>

#if WINVER > 0x0600
#define STILL_GOOD
#endif

#include <winuser.h>
#include <initguid.h>
#include <dbt.h>

EDIT: I use the #if WINVER > 0x0600... statement to determine what the value is.

share|improve this question
    
windows.h includes winuser.h. You shouldn't be including it yourself. –  chris Oct 10 '12 at 22:30
1  
How are you determining that the value as defaulted to 0x400? –  bobestm Oct 10 '12 at 22:44
    
It looks as if you have an out-of-date version of the SDK; V7.0A only ever defines WINVER to be 0x500 or higher. The problem you're describing does not happen in v7.0A, or at least, I can't reproduce it. –  Harry Johnston Oct 11 '12 at 1:54
    
In the past, however, I've seen similar problems resolved by defining only _WIN32_WINNT and letting the headers define WINVER accordingly. –  Harry Johnston Oct 11 '12 at 1:55

3 Answers 3

The right approach for defining these constants is in your project, not in your source files. This way they will come into compilation as command line keys.

These are the only places where the WINVER is defined:

  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\odbcinst.h, line 28(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\sdkddkver.h, lines 166(2), 168(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\WinDef.h, line 39(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\WinGDI.h, line 43(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\WinReg.h, line 29(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\WinResrc.h, line 21(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\WinUser.h, line 39(1).

These are the only places where the _WIN32_WINNT is defined:

  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\ObjBase.h, lines 18(1), 22(1), 26(1), 30(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\ObjIdl.h, lines 604(1), 607(1), 610(1), 613(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\sdkddkver.h, line 151(1).
  • c:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include\WinResrc.h, line 33(1).

As you can see the definitions are under #ifdef. (I have not checked all places).

In case if you have right project, right version of the SDK, etc, then definition from your project should not be overwritten.

If definitions from your project are not properly propagated, this means that something is screwed up. It is hard to tell exactly what.

In any case, the right path is to define these params in your project or makefile.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried defining it in the QT project file so that it was included during compilation as -DWINVER=0x601. The result was the same though –  giroy Oct 10 '12 at 23:12
    
You are correct that it is under #ifdef. The problem is, for some reason, in my code my #defined WINVER is not seen in windows.h so it is defined again, although this is not showing up as a compiler warning. –  giroy Oct 10 '12 at 23:30
    
Try to check your command line to ensure that keys are there.. –  Kirill Kobelev Oct 10 '12 at 23:33

trie the flowing approach

#include <windows.h>

#include <winuser.h>

#ifdef WINVER
#undef WINVER
#endif

#ifdef _WIN32_WINNT
#undef _WIN32_WINNT
#endif

#define WINVER 0x0601
#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0601

#include <initguid.h>
#include <dbt.h>
share|improve this answer
    
I've tried something like this. The problem is WINVER is also ignored in initguid.h and dbt.h where I need it to know that I am using Windows 7. –  giroy Oct 10 '12 at 23:11

Reading the other comments it suggests that windows.h is incorrect. Any chance you have a duplicate windows.h in your search path?

share|improve this answer
    
Windows.h is correct. There is a section that defines WINVER if it is undefined. What I don't understand is why it doesn't see my #define... –  giroy Oct 10 '12 at 23:28
    
Save headers somewhere first and then try putting #error here and there. This will show you what is used/not used. –  Kirill Kobelev Oct 10 '12 at 23:31

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