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I have a matrix, Z, that I want to plot using the surf command. I can plot it just fine using the surf command but I want part of Z to not show up in the plot. I assume what I need to do is use the notation

surf(X,Y,Z)

where X and Y are matrices defining the (x,y) coordinate of the corresponding z value. What I would like to know is what I put as the (x,y) coordinate for points in Z that should not be plotted, i.e. x and y should be nothing.

For example:

Z = 1 5 7
    2 6 0 
    3 0 0
    4 0 0

X = 1 1 1
    2 2 _
    3 _ _
    4 _ _

Y = 1 2 3
    1 2 _
    1 _ _
    1 _ _

What would go in the spaces? I cant put a number like 0 because all the values will just go to the origin. I do not have to use surf() if there is a better method out there to use.

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What happens if you make those zeros in Z N/A? –  im so confused Oct 10 '12 at 22:49
    
what do you mean by N/A? I tried assigning it N/A and Matlab said the variable N cannot be found. 'N/A' did not work either. –  user972276 Oct 10 '12 at 22:55
    
Ah yeah sorry meant NaN, didn't remember exactly what the token was :( –  im so confused Oct 11 '12 at 14:38
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Set to NaN all those values in Z that you don't want to graph. For example, if you don't want to graph the zeros of Z then

Z(Z==0)=NaN;

will do the trick. You don't need to do this with X and Y. If the set of Z that you don't want to graph is more complicated you should somehow obtain the Z(i,j) and set those to NaN.

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thanks! I kept trying null and nill and everything I could think of. Did not think of NaN. –  user972276 Oct 11 '12 at 2:58
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