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d =  { "local" : { "count" : 1,
          "health-beauty" : { "count" : 1,
              "tanning" : { "count" : 1 }
           }
       },
       "nationwide" : { "count" : 9.0 },
       "travel" : { "count" : 0 }
      }    

In this instance "nationwide" is the largest....

Code is below to make it easier to attach to scripts:

d = {'travel': {'count': 0}, 'local': {'count': 1, 'health-beauty': {'count': 1, 'tanning': {'count': 1}}}, 'nationwide': {'count': 9.0}}
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1  
what have you tried? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 10 '12 at 23:15
    
Was looking at print max(d, key=lambda x: x[1]) –  AlexZ Oct 10 '12 at 23:16
1  
you should have made local.tanning the biggest ... as it is none of the answers would find it... –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
>>> max(d, key=lambda x: d[x]['count'])
'nationwide'
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Legend! Was almost there thanks for this –  AlexZ Oct 10 '12 at 23:17
2  
this wont work .. say if your internal dict is biggest(since it doesnt even consider the nested dictionaries) –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:20
1  
Joran: count gets incremented for each child... –  AlexZ Oct 10 '12 at 23:22
    
change d['local']['tanning']["count"] to 10 I will bet you that it doesnt return tanning ... –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:29
1  
ahhh ... I just misunderstood the question I think then... –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:44

This should work for nested dictionary:

def find_max(d, name=None):
    return max((v, name) if k == "count" else find_max(v, k) for k, v in d.items())

>>> find_max(d)
(9.0, 'nationwide')
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1  
that wont work I dont think... local has a key count and more entries that each have their own count... –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:19
    
@JoranBeasley fixed –  defuz Oct 10 '12 at 23:23
    
nice work :) ... –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:32

If "tanning" was 10, and you need to catch that, you might need to flatten the dictionary. Try something like this Flatten nested Python dictionaries, compressing keys

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Could you show an example? –  sehe Oct 10 '12 at 23:42
    
@sehe check the top answer to this question. It has example. –  Iliyan Bobev Oct 10 '12 at 23:55
    
Dropping links as answers is frowned upon. At least show the gist of the answer, adapting it to the specific question. Otherwise, this is not an answer and should have been a comment (possibly a suggested duplicate) –  sehe Oct 10 '12 at 23:57
    
@sehe I have subsequently realized that this should have been a comment. The reason that I ended up with posting an answer is that I lack the score for comments. Anyhow, here's the example of the result: >>> x = { 'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':{ 'aa':11, 'bb':22, 'cc':{ 'aaa':111 } } } >>> {'_'.join(k):v for k,v in flattenDict(x).items()} {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c_aa': 11, 'c_bb': 22, 'c_cc_aaa': 111} Let me know once you get this comment, so I can delete the answer. Cheers. –  Iliyan Bobev Oct 11 '12 at 0:19

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