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I'm working on a problem where I need to create a CartesianProduct class. I should be able to pass this class 2 lists, and then output the Cartesian product (all possible combinations) of these lists.

So far I can create an object out of this class, create all possible combinations, but when I try to output these results to screen I get each item on its own row as if it doesnt realize it is an array.

My code:

class CartesianProduct
    include Enumerable
    # Your code here
    def initialize(a,b)
        @output = []
        a.each do |x|
            b.each do |y|
                if !(output.include? [x,y])
                    output << [x,y]
                end
            end
        end
    end

    #getter
    def output
        @output
    end

    def each
        @output.each do |a| puts a end
    end

    #setter
    def output=(a,b)
        a.each do |x|
            b.each do |y|
                if !(output.include? [a,b])
                    output << [a,b]
                end
            end
        end
    end
end

What Im using to test:

c = CartesianProduct.new([:a,:b], [4,5])
=> #<CartesianProduct:0x93569f8 @output=[[:a, 4], [:a, 5], [:b, 4], [:b, 5]]>

Testing is done via the following command: c.each { |elt| puts elt.inspect }

I get:

irb(main):1403:0> c.each { |elt| puts elt.inspect }
a
4
a
5
b
4
b
5
=> [[:a, 4], [:a, 5], [:b, 4], [:b, 5]]

but I should be getting:

# [:a, 4]
# [:a, 5]
# [:b, 4]
# [:b, 5]

My output is not printing the symbols as symbols but rather converting to string, and its print each item on its own line...

This is homework, so I'm not looking for an answer, but a nudge in the right direction would help quite a bit.

EDIT ======================================================================== Changing my definition of each in the class resolved this issue.

def each
    @output.map do |x|
        yield x
    end
end
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4 Answers 4

Your problem is that you are applying each on c, which is an instance of CartesianProduct. You need to do each on the @output of it. As for how to access @output from outside, you should know; it is a basic thing.

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Even though I defined each inside my class? I thought when I did this and then called c.each it would use my method which references @output? –  ProfessionalAmateur Oct 11 '12 at 0:50
    
Okay, now I see what you are doing. Either 1) Take out your definition of each, and call @output when you do each. That definition is very strange. Or, 2) if you insist in defining each, then you have to use inspect there, and when you call each, all you need is c.each and nothing more. –  sawa Oct 11 '12 at 0:54
    
Im sure it's very bizarre, very new Ruby user. :) When I take out my each and run the test, I get everything one 1 line. => [[:a, 4], [:a, 5], [:b, 4], [:b, 5]] –  ProfessionalAmateur Oct 11 '12 at 1:08
    
I wrote that you should run each on the @output, not c. –  sawa Oct 11 '12 at 1:13
    
That is what I did, I changed my def each @output.each end and the output I get is now: => #<Enumerator: [[:a, 4], [:a, 5], [:b, 4], [:b, 5]]:each> Am I miss understanding your recommendation? Are you saying to perform each on @putput from outside the class? I need to run the test provided so Im not sure if I can do that. Hrm. –  ProfessionalAmateur Oct 11 '12 at 1:18

I'm just starting with Ruby, but I think I found the cause: When you call c.each { |elt| puts elt.inspect } it first executes the call you have defined in the class. The result of that are strings that are passed to the block in the test { |elt| puts elt.inspect } which splits them on separate lines.

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Consider marking this as the questions answer to close it. –  Sunny Juneja Oct 11 '12 at 3:19

Your implementation of #each in CartesianProduct does not accept a block, so, for an instance c, passing a block to c.each has no effect. Try this:

c.each { |elt| raise "an error!" }

# no error is raised because the block is not called.

Now, your definition of each calls puts on each of the arrays in @output. Calling puts on an array will iterate over each element, even within nested arrays (in other words, the flattened version of the array):

ruby-1.9.3-p125 :006 > puts [1,2,[3,4]]
1
2
3
4
=> nil

I believe what you want is an implementation of each that passes a given block to the each method of @output:

def each(&block)
  @output.each(&block)
end
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Changing my definition of each in the class resolved this issue.

def each
    @output.map do |x|
        yield x
    end
end
share|improve this answer

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